Lighting

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Steve Nichols Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

It started back in the old days of Hollywood. The cameramen and directors needed to devise lighting schemes that would create a realistic, three-dimensional look on film. Their solution was what they call "triangle" lighting.

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Jay Abend Posted: Jul 01, 2000 0 comments

I have always considered myself a pack and head guy. You know what I mean--big powerful studio flash generators, long cables, and fan-cooled light heads. Growing up I always thought of a pro photographer as the guy with the view camera...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Steve Bedell, All Rights Reserved

Through the years, I've experimented with many different styles of light and many different light modifiers. There's an old saying that "light is light." That's true, but what a complicated...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 4 comments

I've worked with all kinds of Internet photo studios over the years. Most consist of a light tent of sorts, with or without lights, and the materials used are translucent fabric or plastic. But I have never come across anything like the MyStudio 20 until now. It is definitely different. So, does different make it better, or even as functional as other tabletop setups?

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Steve Bedell Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

Many years ago when I opened my first studio, I visited another photographer who had been in business for many years. When I saw his camera room, I noticed he had a big "X" on the floor in a few...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2001 0 comments

Multiple-flash lighting is easier than ever with today's dedicated flash technology.

When in Madeira, while working on my Kodak Electronic Flash book (Silver Pixel Press), I found myself...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 24, 2014 2 comments
On-camera flash has a bad reputation—and for good reason. In fact, many photographers are turned off to using flash altogether because they don’t like the look of pictures taken when the flash is sitting on the camera. The images look flat, dimensionless, and many subjects look “pasty” with this kind of lighting.
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Steve Bedell Posted: Mar 01, 2011 1 comments

Most of us know about making outdoor portraits using the small fill flash on our cameras. But these photos have a “look” that tells everyone they were “made with flash.” They have a flat, often harsh look to them. A more sophisticated technique that can be accessed with many new cameras is the use of off-camera flash; you can even use multiple units controlled directly from the camera. I use...

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Jay Abend Posted: Oct 01, 2004 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Jay Abend, All Rights Reserved

The look of flash photography has been a problem for photographers for decades. As we migrated from huge silver reflectors stuffed with flash bulbs to smaller and more portable electronic flash units, the look of on-camera...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 01, 2001 0 comments

I live on the East Coast, and I mean right on it. My studio is located about 8 miles from the Atlantic Ocean. People who live here love the beach, and of course the tourists who descend like swarming flies on a slain wildebeest every...

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Norm Haughey Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The impact and success of a studio portrait is often the combined result of lighting, composition, body language, lens choice, camera angle, clothing, color, texture, and even luck. With a few portrait techniques under your belt, however, your luck will improve dramatically. There are many portrait-making methods that can help you develop your own style over time and ultimately...

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Jason Schneider Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

If there's one thing that makes pictures shot by leading professional photographers stand out from the pack, it's lighting. But while it's relatively easy to get precisely controlled lighting effects in a well-equipped studio, these pros have to deliver consistent studio-quality results in the field--whether they're shooting on location in a dark...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 30, 2012 1 comments
The field of studio lighting equipment is a large one and advanced amateur and professional photographers have many different kinds of products to choose from. There are self-powered monolights, traditional power pack and head systems, or continuous light sources that let you see in real time the lighting effect that’s produced. The kind of photographer you are and the type of images you make determines the lighting system that best fits your working style and Dynalite, Interfit, and Rime Lite are three companies that produce systems for every photographic discipline.
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Monte Zucker Posted: Apr 01, 2002 0 comments

Black On Black Is Easy
Still under cover, I photographed the church's Father Frank. I photographed him in black robes against a black background. My aim was to show detail throughout the portrait and separation between his robe and the background.

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 15, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
One of the first lighting kits I ever owned was a set of Smith-Victor Adapta-Lights that had screw-base sockets for photoflood lamps. Son of a gun, the company still offers Adapta-Lights as an entry-level solution for beginning portrait photographers who want to work with hot lights. On the other hand, if you prefer making portraits using electronic flash, Smith-Victor’s three-light FL700K Strobe Light Kit may be just what you’re looking for.

The FL700K Strobe Light Kit that I tested is designed for amateur photographers and aspiring pros and contains two FLC300 (320 ws) FlashLite and one 110i (110 ws) FlashLite monolights. The FLC300 monolights offer continuously variable flash power settings, a test button, a ready light, and an optical slave for wireless triggering and have an umbrella stand adapter that’s compatible with 3/8” through 5/8” light stand posts. To expand the kit’s capabilities, Smith-Victor offers more than 100 accessories and light modifiers for the FLC300 monolights, including softboxes, reflectors, snoots, grids, and barn doors. The 110i monolight has a full- or half-power setting, optical slave, small built-in reflector, and umbrella mount. When used together, all three lights give you lots of flexibility for lighting studio or on-location portraits.

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