Lighting

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Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 01, 2014 0 comments

We all know that dedicated flash units are amazing tools. They allow us to use not just one but several flashes with amazing control over the output and have the math figured out for us in the bargain. But unless we modify the light in some way we are left with a very small light source that can be very harsh, and while that may be fine in some cases, there are times when we need to modify the light to soften and shape it. With the Profoto RFi Speedlight Speedring, you now have the ability to do just that using the many modifiers available to you in the Profoto arsenal.

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Norm Haughey Posted: Sep 01, 2008 1 comments

The impact and success of a studio portrait is often the combined result of lighting, composition, body language, lens choice, camera angle, clothing, color, texture, and even luck. With a few portrait techniques under your belt, however, your luck will improve dramatically. There are many portrait-making methods that can help you develop your own style over time and ultimately...

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Jason Schneider Posted: Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

If there's one thing that makes pictures shot by leading professional photographers stand out from the pack, it's lighting. But while it's relatively easy to get precisely controlled lighting effects in a well-equipped studio, these pros have to deliver consistent studio-quality results in the field--whether they're shooting on location in a dark...

Dan Havlik Posted: Dec 15, 2014 0 comments

We reviewed the Profoto B1 500 AirTTL battery-powered studio light earlier this year and while we, generally, loved this portable strobe solution the one thing missing was high-speed sync. Profoto corrected that this morning by offering a new High-Speed Sync (HSS) feature to the B1 that’s available now via a free firmware update.

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 30, 2012 1 comments
The field of studio lighting equipment is a large one and advanced amateur and professional photographers have many different kinds of products to choose from. There are self-powered monolights, traditional power pack and head systems, or continuous light sources that let you see in real time the lighting effect that’s produced. The kind of photographer you are and the type of images you make determines the lighting system that best fits your working style and Dynalite, Interfit, and Rime Lite are three companies that produce systems for every photographic discipline.
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Monte Zucker Posted: Apr 01, 2002 0 comments

Black On Black Is Easy
Still under cover, I photographed the church's Father Frank. I photographed him in black robes against a black background. My aim was to show detail throughout the portrait and separation between his robe and the background.

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 15, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
One of the first lighting kits I ever owned was a set of Smith-Victor Adapta-Lights that had screw-base sockets for photoflood lamps. Son of a gun, the company still offers Adapta-Lights as an entry-level solution for beginning portrait photographers who want to work with hot lights. On the other hand, if you prefer making portraits using electronic flash, Smith-Victor’s three-light FL700K Strobe Light Kit may be just what you’re looking for.

The FL700K Strobe Light Kit that I tested is designed for amateur photographers and aspiring pros and contains two FLC300 (320 ws) FlashLite and one 110i (110 ws) FlashLite monolights. The FLC300 monolights offer continuously variable flash power settings, a test button, a ready light, and an optical slave for wireless triggering and have an umbrella stand adapter that’s compatible with 3/8” through 5/8” light stand posts. To expand the kit’s capabilities, Smith-Victor offers more than 100 accessories and light modifiers for the FLC300 monolights, including softboxes, reflectors, snoots, grids, and barn doors. The 110i monolight has a full- or half-power setting, optical slave, small built-in reflector, and umbrella mount. When used together, all three lights give you lots of flexibility for lighting studio or on-location portraits.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2005 2 comments

Studio lighting often carries with it the stigma of high cost and high demands (on electricity and learning curve), but that is not necessarily the case. Studio lighting is only as complicated as you make it. You can buy an inexpensive set of lights that will do all you need, with a short learning curve, without fear of shorting circuits around the house. Augment these lights with...

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 01, 2009 3 comments

Much of my portrait and fashion photography is done on location, but living in a place like Colorado the models (and the photographer, too) just aren’t always in the mood to stomp around in the cold weather and snow. That’s when a studio comes in handy. Some photographers just prefer having complete control over the lighting. Instead of the hassle and cost of renting a studio, why not...

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Jay Abend Posted: Mar 01, 1999 0 comments

If you've been reading any of my articles recently, you're no doubt aware that I like lighting gear. I especially like studio flash generators, big pro flash lamp heads, heavy-duty movie set style Matthews "C" stands, giant...

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Tony L. Corbell Posted: Nov 01, 2000 0 comments

What began as a story elicited so many responses that we've decided to continue it as a regular column. Here, technical representatives from manufacturers and suppliers share tips, techniques, thoughts, and photos with you. If you're a supplier...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

When it comes to lighting tabletops, professional photographers often opt for the sweep table. A sweep table looks like an oversized chair, but, instead of cushions, it comes in an assemblage consisting of an upward curving, or
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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

Few people realize that photographic spot meters date back some 2/3 of a century. The very first was built by Arthur Dalladay, editor of The British Journal of Photography, in about 1935; he described it in the BJP Almanac of 1937 on pages 127-138. This meter still exists, in the possession of a...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 1999 0 comments

"A lot of what we do as nature photographers is spend time looking around for places to go when the light is right," Tony Sweet says. And, once those places have been found, waiting around for the right light to put in an appearance.

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Dec 17, 2014 0 comments

If you are a night owl and love the art of light painting then the Pixelstick should certainly be on your holiday wish list. The Pixelstick transforms the darkness of the night by adding a rainbow of bright LED color to your light painting photography.

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