Lighting

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Dec 17, 2014 0 comments

If you are a night owl and love the art of light painting then the Pixelstick should certainly be on your holiday wish list. The Pixelstick transforms the darkness of the night by adding a rainbow of bright LED color to your light painting photography.

Dan Havlik Posted: Dec 15, 2014 0 comments

We reviewed the Profoto B1 500 AirTTL battery-powered studio light earlier this year and while we, generally, loved this portable strobe solution the one thing missing was high-speed sync. Profoto corrected that this morning by offering a new High-Speed Sync (HSS) feature to the B1 that’s available now via a free firmware update.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Nov 24, 2014 0 comments
Capturing the details in nature requires getting close to small subjects and sometimes you will want to use flash. Shooting close-ups with flash is very different than using flash as you normally do.

The biggest problem we face when using the built-in flash or even a small hotshoe mounted accessory flash for macro work is that a flash sits no more than 6 or 7” above the lens. This means it will illuminate the top of a subject, leaving the middle and bottom portions in shadow. There’s no way the light can be dispersed over the insect, small flower, feather or whatever you might be shooting because it doesn’t have enough distance to do that.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Nov 17, 2014 1 comments

The new Lume Cube is a portable, versatile 1,500-lumen external flash and video light made for use with the GoPro Hero (or any digital camera), iPhone and Android smartphones. Featuring a simple mobile interface, the Lume Cube allows you to capture better images in low light situations, allowing for more creative opportunities for photographers of all skill levels.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 27, 2014 0 comments

The problem with making the right exposures in low light environments is that exposure meters, in-camera and hand held, are not particularly suited for the task. Light meters were designed to read subjects in normal daylight situations or in bright interiors. The meter will deliver a good exposure under these “normal” conditions, but low light photography is anything but normal. There is either a lack of light, many dark areas, very high contrast or all of these combined.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Sep 25, 2014 0 comments

A great tool to have in your gear bag or pocket when shooting at night or in dark areas in the rugged outdoors, the Pelican ProGear 3310PL LED flashlight flashlight was created to be tough, reliable and practical.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 20, 2014 0 comments

Metz has just launched the latest addition to its flash system lineup: the new Mecablitz 64 AF-1. Offering an impressive guide number of 64 (210 feet) at ISO 100/21˚, it has a large color touch display, an Automatic Flash mode with 12 f/stops, a Manual Flash mode with 25 partial light levels and a Remote TTL mode.

Steve Bedell Posted: Aug 01, 2014 0 comments

We all know that dedicated flash units are amazing tools. They allow us to use not just one but several flashes with amazing control over the output and have the math figured out for us in the bargain. But unless we modify the light in some way we are left with a very small light source that can be very harsh, and while that may be fine in some cases, there are times when we need to modify the light to soften and shape it. With the Profoto RFi Speedlight Speedring, you now have the ability to do just that using the many modifiers available to you in the Profoto arsenal.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Jul 28, 2014 0 comments

LEDGO has introduced a new line of professional LED light panels (models LG-600S, LG-600CS, LG-1200S and LG-1200CS) that feature a >95 CRI rating, an all metal housing and removable metal barn doors—in single and bi-color models—and Sony V-Lock battery adapter plates. Prices range from $439 to $799.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jun 20, 2014 0 comments
Light can be manipulated and controlled to suit our artistic needs. There are limitations, though. You can’t turn midday sunlight into a sunset, and it’s not possible to change the direction of the light such that you artificially introduce long shadows in a scene devoid of them. Nevertheless, there are things you can do with respect to color, intensity, contrast and even reflections that are worth exploring.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 24, 2014 2 comments
On-camera flash has a bad reputation—and for good reason. In fact, many photographers are turned off to using flash altogether because they don’t like the look of pictures taken when the flash is sitting on the camera. The images look flat, dimensionless, and many subjects look “pasty” with this kind of lighting.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Feb 24, 2014 0 comments
A failed flash photograph has an exposure in which the subject is too light or too dark. In addition, the foreground is too light—in fact, it’s lighter than the subject—and therefore distracting. In some circumstances, very dark or black backgrounds behind a subject are not desirable, and this can be considered a failure as well.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Feb 24, 2014 2 comments

On-camera flash is convenient and very fast to use, but it’s not a flattering type of light. It’s a flat type of lighting with seemingly no depth, it creates unattractive shadows, and any surface that has sheen to it will reflect the light back into the lens.

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 30, 2012 1 comments
The field of studio lighting equipment is a large one and advanced amateur and professional photographers have many different kinds of products to choose from. There are self-powered monolights, traditional power pack and head systems, or continuous light sources that let you see in real time the lighting effect that’s produced. The kind of photographer you are and the type of images you make determines the lighting system that best fits your working style and Dynalite, Interfit, and Rime Lite are three companies that produce systems for every photographic discipline.
Joe Farace Posted: Nov 15, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
One of the first lighting kits I ever owned was a set of Smith-Victor Adapta-Lights that had screw-base sockets for photoflood lamps. Son of a gun, the company still offers Adapta-Lights as an entry-level solution for beginning portrait photographers who want to work with hot lights. On the other hand, if you prefer making portraits using electronic flash, Smith-Victor’s three-light FL700K Strobe Light Kit may be just what you’re looking for.

The FL700K Strobe Light Kit that I tested is designed for amateur photographers and aspiring pros and contains two FLC300 (320 ws) FlashLite and one 110i (110 ws) FlashLite monolights. The FLC300 monolights offer continuously variable flash power settings, a test button, a ready light, and an optical slave for wireless triggering and have an umbrella stand adapter that’s compatible with 3/8” through 5/8” light stand posts. To expand the kit’s capabilities, Smith-Victor offers more than 100 accessories and light modifiers for the FLC300 monolights, including softboxes, reflectors, snoots, grids, and barn doors. The 110i monolight has a full- or half-power setting, optical slave, small built-in reflector, and umbrella mount. When used together, all three lights give you lots of flexibility for lighting studio or on-location portraits.

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