Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart  |  Dec 01, 2002  |  0 comments

Fujifilm FinePix S2Pro

I was standing in Times Square, the Fuji S2 Pro with 28-105mm f/2.8 lens in my hands, when I chanced to glance over my shoulder and noticed someone peering at me. The quizzical expression on my face was greeted by a...

Jack Neubart  |  May 01, 2009  |  0 comments

How many times have you traveled somewhere and taken a beautiful picture without quite knowing where you were at that instant later? That’s where “geotagging” (or “geocoding”) enters the picture.

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 01, 2009  |  0 comments

I love getting intimately close to my subjects with my digital SLRs, especially nature, and to achieve this goal I’ll use the best tools at my disposal. Understanding that a macro zoom may not bring me as close as I’d like, I’ll turn to a macro lens. But even this lens may not be practical or readily available in all situations. Sometimes we’d simply like to extend the...

Jack Neubart  |  Jul 01, 2005  |  0 comments

You may have set out to buy the ultimate tripod, only to discover that you'll also have to buy a separate head to shoulder the burden of your cameras. Or you may want to upgrade to a head better suited to your style of photography. For example, I wouldn't use the same head in my studio that I use when traveling: I'd want something lighter, with faster setup when...

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 08, 2012  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Attempting to make the HDR process more user-friendly, the newly updated HDR Expose and Photoshop-dedicated plug-in 32 Float, now both in Version 2, largely share the same features and enhancements. As I see it, the improvements center mainly on workflow—reason enough to upgrade, in my opinion, and reason enough to consider these as serious tools for HDR work. Both are available from Unified Color Technologies.

Jack Neubart  |  Aug 08, 2014  |  0 comments

The goal in HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging is to recapture the full tonal range that you saw in the scene, despite dynamic range limitations of the camera sensor. Previously, HDR technique generally involved use of a tripod: now, while it is still advisable, it may become an option. It also required a static scene totally devoid of movement. Any movement resulted in misalignment and ghosting, or secondary images, caused by a shift in camera position or of moving objects from frame to frame.

Jack Neubart  |  Mar 19, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  4 comments

The merge to HDR process has for too long been a mystery wrapped inside an enigma. That cloak of mystery is one giant step closer to being removed thanks to HDR Express, from Unified Color Technologies (www.unifiedcolor.com). While this software greatly simplifies the process, successful HDR merges don’t just happen when you click a button. There is some planning involved.

Jack Neubart  |  Feb 17, 2015  |  0 comments

Hospitality photography focuses on hotels, resorts, and casinos but it’s not just about capturing luxury accommodations and lush exterior shots of surrounding vistas and scenery. It’s as much about highlighting comfort, relaxation, and fun. The pictures may include special dishes prepared by gourmet chefs, waiters serving tables, and guests enjoying the ambience and amenities. It’s a smorgasbord of images designed to appeal to a wide range of tastes, albeit presented with an air of sophistication to make any potential guest feel like a prince or princess upon arrival.

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 05, 2016  |  0 comments

Social media has clearly taken the world by storm and photographers have been quick to catch on. That is indeed true for extreme sports photographer Christian Pondella, who has a strong following on several social media platforms, particularly Instagram.

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 18, 2017  |  0 comments

Ira Block can best be described as a cultural documentary photographer. He uses his camera to document cultures around the world, recording how lives are impacted by changing norms, practices, and traditions. The changes are most often gradual, which is why he returns to a location time after time after time. He captures the shifting sands, one grain at a time, helping us see these changes and appreciate them through his eyes—and through social media.

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