Mirrorless Camera Reviews

Sort By: Post DateTitle Publish Date
Jason Schneider  |  Mar 10, 2016  |  0 comments

Judging by its understated model designation it would be easy to conclude that the Sony Alpha A6300 mirrorless camera is simply an upgraded Alpha A6000 with 4K video capture added to its already impressive feature set. After spending the better part of three days shooting with the A6300 during a press trip last week to Miami, FL, I am confident that the new model is a lot more than that. In short, it’s a real game changer that represents a significant technological breakthrough for Sony, and for the entire mirrorless camera category.

Edited by George Schaub  |  Jun 24, 2014  |  First Published: May 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The Sony A7 and A7R are the first mirrorless system cameras with a full-frame sensor. The A7 offers a sensor size of 35.8x23.9mm and a resolution of 24MP, while the A7R has a slightly larger sensor at 35.9x24.0mm and 36MP resolution. Both cameras use the E-mount lens system that was introduced with Sony’s NEX cameras. Because NEX cameras use APS-C-sized sensors all previous E-mount lenses have smaller image circles, thus the full-frame models require new E-mount lenses, which cover the larger image circle of a full-frame sensor.

Henry Anderson  |  Jun 10, 2015  |  0 comments

We’ve just returned from Sony’s New York City press conference where the company announced a trio of groundbreaking new cameras: the 42.4-megapixel, full frame Sony A7R II mirrorless camera, the 20MP Sony RX100 IV compact camera and the 20MP Sony RX10 II superzoomer.

Edited by George Schaub  |  May 25, 2012  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2012  |  3 comments

The Sony NEX-7 is a compact camera with an E-mount system and an extremely high resolution (24MP). The metal body is very robust and sports a stylish retro design, which offers new features like two additional setup dials to change image parameters. These setup dials, located on the camera back and accessed using the right-hand thumb, are integrated seamlessly into the body and nearly invisible when looking at the camera from the top.

George Schaub  |  Aug 15, 2011  |  0 comments

The Sony NEX-C3 is an ultra compact CSC (compact system cameras) system with an APS-C sized sensor. The camera offers a resolution of 16 MP (megapixels), which is similar to some Sony SLT cameras like the SLT-A35. The main difference in the concept of the NEX cameras is the very compact body and the fact that the camera doesn’t work with an optical or electronic viewfinder, but only with the LCD screen on the back as viewfinder and control monitor.

George Schaub  |  Oct 01, 2010  |  0 comments

At the recent TIPA (Technical Image Press Association) meeting we had an ongoing debate about how to classify cameras like the new Sony Alpha NEX-3.

Jason Schneider  |  Sep 25, 2019  |  0 comments

You want a cutting-edge mirrorless camera system, but you don't want to pay bleeding edge prices for it? The good news is there are many excellent mirrorless cameras you can buy without busting your budget. In the following guide, we pick our seven favorite mirrorless cameras for under $1000.

Jason Schneider  |  Dec 11, 2019  |  0 comments

Street photography, capturing authentic, un-posed pictures of people being themselves, is a genre that dates back to the mid 19th century. It rapidly evolved with the introduction smaller cameras like the 35mm Leica I of 1925, and as faster films and high-speed lenses of superior quality became available.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Apr 19, 2018  |  0 comments

Shutterbug, a member of the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA), once again teamed up with over two dozen other member magazines from around the world to select the winners in the annual TIPA World Awards for the best photo products of 2018 in 40 different categories.

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 25, 2020  |  0 comments

It's been the worst kept secret in the camera industry but it's finally here. Fujifilm officially unveiled the X-T4 tonight and Shutterbug got some pre-release hands-on time with this 26.1MP mirrorless camera, which is the follow-up to the well-reviewed X-T3 from only a year and a half ago.

Jason Schneider  |  May 01, 2010  |  0 comments

The first digital Leica M with a full-frame, 24x36mm sensor (active area 23.9x35.8mm), the M9 offers 18-megapixel capture and unrestricted coverage with nearly the entire range of Leica lenses past and present, including extreme wide angles.

 

Perhaps even more important, the M9’s exclusive 18-megapixel CCD, developed by Kodak with input from Leica, has addressed the foibles that...

Joe Farace  |  Mar 20, 2018  |  0 comments

“Never have I found the limits of the photographic potential. Every horizon, upon being reached, reveals another beckoning in the distance.”—W. Eugene Smith

Joe Farace  |  Jul 09, 2013  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2013  |  0 comments

When creating their mirrorless camera system, Panasonic wisely, I think, chose the Micro Four Thirds format rather than designing an all-new proprietary lens mount. The system includes two dozen or so Lumix lenses, including conversion lenses, along with adapters for Leica R and M mount lenses, Four Thirds digital SLRs, plus the ability to use lenses from Olympus, Sigma, and Tamron. The Micro Four Thirds system is here to stay and the Lumix DMC-G5 seems a perfect way to jump on board.

Joe Farace  |  Jan 24, 2013  |  First Published: Dec 01, 2012  |  1 comments

The Pentax K-01 belongs to a class of cameras generally known as “mirrorless”—Pentax calls it a hybrid—that combine large LCD screens with interchangeable lenses and more often than not a retro look. Marc Newson, the Australian industrial designer who crafted the Pentax K-01, works in a style called biomorphism that uses smooth flowing lines, translucency, and an absence of sharp edges. The camera is available in black, white, or Newson’s signature yellow with the designer’s logo on the bottom.

Jason Schneider  |  Jul 02, 2012  |  First Published: May 01, 2012  |  0 comments

As advanced electronics continue to supplant more and more elements of camera function and design, often displacing optical and mechanical systems, the camera of the future is being redefined. To give you a clearer picture of the emerging technologies that are destined to change the shape of cameras to come, let’s take a closer look at the implications of some of the emerging new tech found in the latest models.

Pages

X