Photo How To

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Ron Leach  |  Jan 17, 2018  |  0 comments

Yesterday we featured an eye-opening tutorial that explained how to be a better street shooter by overcoming a fear of photographing strangers. And today’s follow-up offers some great insight into the work of an iconic street shooter who once said “Street photography is a stupid term. 

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jun 05, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

The camera Michael carries might be his Leica M6, loaded with either Ilford XP-2 or Kodak BW400CN chromogenic film and fitted with either a 35mm f/2 or 50mm f/2 Summicron lens; or his Fuji X10 point-and-shoot with its zoom lens set for the equivalent of 50mm; or his Nikon D200 or D700 with the manual 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens he got with his F3 back when he was in college.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 09, 2016  |  0 comments

Not long ago I caught up with Timothy Schenck, a New York-based professional photographer who specializes in the architectural stories of projects he considers will someday have historical and lasting cultural significance.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 01, 2022  |  1 comments

If the headline above strikes you as a bit crazy, join the club. We were more than a bit skeptical when we stumbled upon this quick tutorial because of the conventional wisdom that using a lens hood is one of the easiest ways to improve outdoor images.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 29, 2016  |  0 comments

Time-lapse photography and time-lapse videos are still immensely popular and interest in them shows no signs of slowing down (so to speak). In fact, a spectacular time-lapse video of Chicago was the fifth most popular story on Shutterbug.com in 2016 and it’s easy to see why.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 08, 2018  |  0 comments

As much as everyone loves their furry best friends, all too often photographers settle for snapshots, rather than artistic images, of their pets. All that’s about to change with the eight fun and easy tips in the quick video below, that will help you capture dazzling images of dogs.

Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  1 comments

Whether you're the proud owner of some hot new wheels, or enjoy shooting pictures at car shows, there are a few tips to keep in mind which will make your photography easier and more fun.

 

It's important to keep your camera angle in mind when...

Ron Leach  |  Nov 10, 2020  |  0 comments

There’s nothing like a bit of motion blur or slightly missed focus to spoil an otherwise great shot. But with the eight tips below, and a little practice, you’ll be able to shoot sharper wildlife photographs every time.

Maria Piscopo  |  Nov 18, 2014  |  1 comments

Even with today’s “everyone with a camera is a photographer” syndrome, the event photography business is still ripe for making sales. With event photography, clients can’t use stock photos and shooting their own images often turns out to be below par, at best. It is a very specialized field of professional photography requiring both personal and business skills.

Tom Harms  |  May 27, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

As image resolution keeps getting bigger and better, photographers are challenged storing their images. One cost-effective solution that’s gaining in popularity and offers good protection is a Network-Attached Storage (NAS) server. However, they are a relatively unfamiliar option for most photographers who aren’t IT-oriented, so we thought it would be a good idea to get guidance on them from an expert.—Editor

David Zimmerman  |  May 23, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

There’s nothing more discouraging than making great shots in the field only to discover that they are nowhere to be found on your memory card when you get to your home or studio. That’s why we were happy to receive this list of mistakes to avoid when dealing with memory cards from David Zimmerman, CEO of LC Technology, a company that supplies data management and recovery solutions to a wide variety of companies within the field.—Editor

Susan Park  |  Oct 19, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  2 comments

With the profusion of new cards with various and often confusing classifications and ratings we thought it a good idea to get guidance on selecting the right card for your camera and way of working from an expert. We recently met with the folks from SanDisk and they were kind enough to offer the following synopsis of card and camera, ratings and usage.—Editor

David Grover  |  Jun 03, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

An exposed photographic plate or a segment of exposed film inside a dark camera body are analog equivalents of today’s Raw file. Before digital technology made it possible to capture visual images electronically, a photograph was visible only after it had been processed in a darkroom with chemicals. Now the processing is handled either in camera or by Raw rendering software. The word “Raw” is not an acronym; it’s a simple description for a file that contains pure data, invisible to the human eye.

Jason Schneider  |  May 20, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Given that the physical and perceptual experience of making a photograph is shaped by technology, and that technology is also embedded in the resulting images, one of the chief and perhaps most profound changes in how we make an image has been the changes in focusing—and recently autofocusing—technology. There’s a reason that the documentary photojournalism of Lewis W. Hine (shot with a ponderous 5x7 view camera or a 4x5 Graflex SLR) has a qualitatively different feel from that of Alfred Eisenstaedt or Henri Cartier-Bresson (shot with pocket-sized 35mm rangefinder cameras). It’s not only framing—it’s responsiveness, spontaneity, and, perhaps, repose, that underlies what these image-makers showed us.

Seth Shostak  |  Dec 09, 2016  |  0 comments

Depending on your photographic interests, depth of field—the range of distances over which your lens will be sharp—can affect you in either propitious or problematic ways. If you’re trying to isolate one face in a group, a shallow depth of field is just what you need. If you’re hoping to capture the drama of a racehorse beating down the track in your direction, then shallow depth of field can turn much of the equine into a befuddling brown blur, no matter how high your shutter speed.

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