Photo How To

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Lynne Eodice  |  Mar 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

 

When a photo emphasizes a particular color, it often dictates the mood of the picture—be it warm or cool, bright or muted. Blue is usually associated with soothing, cool and more-somber moods. Conversely, the color red conjures up emotions like passion, heat, love, and even anger.

We often...

Lynne Eodice  |  May 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

It seems that everywhere you look, you see nature photos that include water in its many forms, whether they're waves crashing on a rocky coastline, snow on a hillside, dewdrops on flower petals, or a simple ripple on a pond. For outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy taking pictures of water, the possibilities are...

Lynne Eodice  |  Jun 01, 2003  |  0 comments

 

 

 

There are a number of ways to portray "heat" in a photograph. First of all, you can use color. Perhaps more than any other design element, color determines the mood of your pictures. You can establish the entire mood of your photo by emphasizing a particular color scheme—reds, golds, and oranges are...

Bryan Peterson  |  Jan 26, 2018  |  0 comments

Most of us are familiar with the use of out-of-focus, seamless backgrounds by studio photographers, especially those who shoot portraits. Often, these backgrounds are a single color, such as white, black, or gray. In other cases, the backgrounds are a muslin material, adding texture to the background. The sole purpose of these backgrounds is to create a cleaner overall composition, giving the viewer no choice but to look at the man, woman, or child.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Mar 25, 2019  |  0 comments

It's an eternal debate amongst photographers: do you prefer shooting with prime lenses or zoom lenses? Of course, it's completely subjective to say which one is better but it's always fun to discuss.

George Schaub  |  Apr 24, 2014  |  0 comments

The print completes the creative circle you began inscribing when you first viewed the image and snapped the shutter. The beauty of black and white printmaking is that you can share that vision through interpretive techniques that include expressive use of tonality, artful contrast and exposure control. Yes, digital images can be viewed on a screen and shared through the Internet to a worldwide audience. But nothing quite matches the intimate beauty of a carefully produced print, one that can be hung on a wall in your home or a gallery.

George Schaub  |  Jun 21, 2018  |  0 comments

When teamed together properly, your image files, monitor, image-processing software, and printer can produce prints that you will be justly proud to show. My aim here is to provide tips that will give your prints that extra touch so you can produce wall-worthy work that displays the characteristics of color, tone, and contrast that fully expresses your vision.

Ron Leach  |  Jan 20, 2022  |  0 comments

Whether you shoot landscapes, wildlife, sports, or just about any other type of photos, if you miss focus you’ve pretty much botched the job. That’s because unsharp results are one of the most common ways to spoil an otherwise great scene.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  May 12, 2016  |  1 comments

Even photographers who usually shoot in Manual Mode should take a closer look at Program AE Mode. Why? Because in the right hands, the two modes are more similar than they are different. 

Scott Kelby  |  Aug 22, 2017  |  0 comments

Q. You mentioned the Canon 5D Mark III and its full-frame shooting capabilities in the June 2017 issue. I own a 5D Mark III and have noticed that when printing some of the photo is cropped, depending on the size (such as 11x14). I have printed at home and used print labs, and there is always a portion of the photo that is cropped. Is there a formula for getting the whole photo printed—either how the photo is shot, camera settings, software, etc.?

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 20, 2019  |  0 comments

If you’re feeling low and uninspired about your photography, travel photographer Pierre T. Lambert has some advice for you: try shooting from a low angle. As Lambert explains in the somewhat counterintuitive video below, going low can yield high quality results.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 16, 2016  |  0 comments

While everyone here probably has a good understanding of how to arrive at a proper exposure by manipulating aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings, a quick refresher is always helpful. The short video below provides just that and includes a few other important bits of technical advice on how to capture high quality photos.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 11, 2018  |  1 comments

Yes, this seemed counterintuitive to us too but it’s actually pretty clever. Photographer Pierre T. Lambert, who we have featured on Shutterbug.com many times, has a neat trick that will help you capture unique photos: put something in front of your lens.

Shutterbug Staff  |  May 27, 2019  |  0 comments

Here’s a quick camera tip from travel photographer Pierre T. Lambert that’s worth trying out. It often seems like we’re all addicted to reviewing our images on the back screen right after we take them. And, in fact, there’s a camera setting that lets you immediately review the shots for a few seconds on the LCD display on back. (Most of you probably have it on.)

Dan Havlik  |  Jul 06, 2018  |  0 comments

Here’s a simple trick that will help you get the right exposure in your photos without all the unnecessary stress. According to photographer Pierre T. Lambert who shares the quick tip in the short video below, the technique will speed up your shooting process because you’ll be able to get great looking photos without frustrating trial and error.

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