Photo How To

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Oct 29, 2018  |  0 comments

Photographer Peter McKinnon pays a visit to the Neon Demon Studio in Toronto, Canada to offer his tips on how to shoot better photos in low light in the video tutorial below.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 15, 2021  |  0 comments

If there’s one underutilized technique for achieving superior results when editing images in Photoshop, it’s the use of Luminosity Masks to balance out the tones and create truly captivating photographs. Best yet, this powerful method is very easy to master.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 11, 2021  |  0 comments

Would you like to try your hand at close-up photography but can’t afford an expensive macro lens? Well consider this: An affordable set of extension tubes will turn just about any lens you own into a close-focusing macro lens.

Ron Leach  |  Jul 06, 2021  |  0 comments

This is a great time of year to make macro magic, as there are flowers, insects, and other small creatures just about everywhere you look. All you really need is a close-focusing lens and the following tips from Swedish pro Micael Widell.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Oct 19, 2017  |  0 comments

Shutterbug reader Steven M. Richman made this beautiful image of the Jama Masjid mosque in Delhi, India, this past December. Because it can be challenging to capture the entire mosque from within, he decided to focus on only part of it. 

Ron Leach  |  Aug 10, 2022  |  0 comments

Many photographers love printing their images and displaying their best photos at home or at work. Beautiful prints also make great gifts for family and friends, and they’re also a great way to closely evaluate your work.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 30, 2022  |  0 comments

One of the challenges with all forms of outdoor photography is that scenes often have a wide-range of tones—often beyond the density range of your camera. The best way to deal with situations like these is editing selective portions of the image.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 14, 2021  |  0 comments

Landscape and travel scenes can be particularly striking when captured in black and white. Some photographers set their camera to monochrome so they can see the effect on the LCD screen, while others prefer to shoot in color and make the conversion during the editing process.

Deborah Sandidge  |  Feb 26, 2019  |  0 comments

Color is everywhere, so why would I be writing about finding and using it in photos? Why would this even be a concern?

Ron Leach  |  Jun 08, 2022  |  0 comments

Experienced photographers are always on the lookout for distracting background elements that can ruin a photo. Unfortunately, it’s not always possible to find a different vantage point from which to shoot that excludes the offending junk.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 26, 2021  |  0 comments

Not everyone has an opportunity to go on safari to photograph rare and wild animals, but most of us have a zoo nearby which is often the next best thing. The problem is that most images shot at the zoo look like were shot at the zoo.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 12, 2017  |  0 comments

Everyone knows that shooting during the sweet light of  “golden hour” makes for better landscape and nature images. But in this tutorial from innovative photographer Manny Ortiz you’ll learn how to take great portraits when the sun is low in the sky.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 02, 2018  |  0 comments

Anyone can go out and buy a sophisticated DSLR, as long as they have the cash. But knowing how to take advantage of the capabilities a camera provides is a whole other matter. In the video below, nature photographer Steve Perry reveals seven tips and tricks for making the most of a new Nikon DSLR, or the one you already own.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 14, 2018  |  0 comments

If there’s one universal truth that applies to whatever type of photographs you shoot, it’s this: If you don’t compose a scene properly, the image you capture won’t have as much visual power as possible. And despite our best efforts to frame photos correctly in the camera, a bit of cropping is occasionally necessary during the editing process.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Mar 25, 2014  |  0 comments

I have long been intrigued with kaleidoscopic images, but it’s virtually impossible to photograph into a traditional kaleidoscope because the hole through which you look to see the beautiful designs is too small. Several years ago I figured out how to construct a kaleidoscope that would permit photography, and I’ve always had a lot of fun with it. The cost is around $5-$10, and it can be put together in just a few minutes.

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