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Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

All photos © Lou Manna

 

New York-based food photographer Lou Manna discusses shooting trends: "The old style of photographing food involved lots of props, edge-to-edge sharpness, dramatic, shadowy light and was shot from a high angle. On the other hand, today's...

Shutterbug Staff  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Picture This!

Picture This! - Our Next Assignment

Super Wide
When you photograph with 35mm lenses, including and wider than 24mm, you are in super-wide...

Robert E. Mayer  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Cokin Offers New Round Glass Filters
Cokin, long known as a maker of hundreds of different versions of square and rectangular acrylic filters, now offers several round filters made of glass for the US market. They are a UV-0 and circular polarizer. Round filters...

Jack Hollingsworth  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

"How's it goin'?" a writer friend asked me recently. "Busy," I said. "That's great," he said. We talked some more, and what I ended up telling him was that one of the reasons things were going well and I was staying busy was that in addition...

Monte Zucker  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

It used to be that you bought black and white film, exposed it, took it into the darkroom and spent days upon days selecting the right paper, developer, time, and temperature. Not anymore...at least, not for me! I'm shooting with my Canon EOS 10D and EOS-1Ds cameras and changing color...

Roger W. Hicks  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Maco is not a name that is particularly familiar to most zphotographers--and those who do know the name are inclined to say "great products, shame about the documentation." Examples of the shortcomings of the latter are easy to find. For example, the same film-developer...

Ben Clay/Web Photo School  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Most studio photographers would agree that lighting and photographing highly reflective objects can be extremely challenging, particularly curved objects like this turtle that mirror everything in the room. Since your lights will show...

Frances E. Schultz  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Dateline 1940: "The fastest film in the world is the new Tri-X, with twice the speed of Super-XX." If you want the numbers, the British Journal of Photography Almanac for 1940 (actually written in 1939) reckoned it was 7000 H&D.

That's right. Tri-X was...

Roger W. Hicks  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

This article was very nearly called "9600," which is what you get if you multiply 24 by 400. Twenty-four films, that is, times ISO 400. There are at least this many, though half a dozen or so aren't available in the US. Even 18 films is however a pretty impressive number for a...

Robert E. Mayer  |  Feb 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Here is a quick tip list
on letters for the HELP! desk:

Please confine yourself to only one question per letter. Both postal
letters and e-mails are fine, although we prefer e-mail as the most
efficientfo...

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