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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2015 0 comments

The reality is you can make portraits using any lens but most photographers will tell you the ideal portrait lens has a focal length in the range of 85-135mm. The first dedicated portrait lens was the 150mm f/3.3 Petzval developed in 1840, which had a 30-degree angle of view and was considerably faster than lenses of the period. It was so legendary that Lomography recently produced a new version for Canon EF- and Nikon F-mount cameras that costs $599.

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Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Portraits From The Real World
Dick Sanders is an interesting guy. Like many of us, he became interested in photography while young, but the career path that led him to create the arresting images that populate this site (

Joe Farace Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Riddle me this: What's the hardest thing to find on any location shoot? If you said, "clients who were on time," that would be partially true, but the correct answer is--an AC power outlet. They're even more difficult to find if you're at the beach, in a park, or as I often find myself, on a racetrack somewhere. One of the niftiest solutions...

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

“All power corrupts, but we need the electricity”—Anonymous

It was a dark and stormy night… Mary and I were watching a DVD when the house was hit with a massive power surge. For a second I wondered about my computers but quickly forgot about them until turning them on a few days later. My Mac Pro and peripherals that are connected to a hefty APC (

Joe Farace Posted: Jul 31, 2015 0 comments

Everybody makes prints from their digital image files—everybody. It may just be cranking out a few photo prints from a birthday party on a kiosk at Walgreens, or wedding photographers having full albums printed at commercial labs, but contrary to some pundits who claim digital has destroyed the need for a physical print, they are still being made and enjoyed. As Mark Twain once said, “Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.”

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Joe Farace Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

“Part of the inhumanity of the computer is that, once it is competently programmed and working smoothly, it is completely honest.”—Isaac Asimov

One possible answer to the proverbial question “what is pro gear” might rightly be answered in this month’s Web Profiles (I don’t want to ruin the surprise), but a more conventional answer will be found in...

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Joe Farace Posted: Dec 08, 2015 0 comments

While compiling a list of my favorite professional DSLRs two things came to my mind: At this point in the 21st century, why are they still called DSLRs and not simply SLRs? Canon’s top-of-the-line, film-based EOS-1v was introduced in 2000 and is long gone. Nikon’s F6 ($2,399) was launched in 2004, and although you can still buy one, not many people do. To me it’s like calling automobiles “horseless carriages” and since I don’t think a Nikon F7 is around the corner, let’s put this abbreviation to bed.

Joe Farace Posted: Jan 25, 2016 0 comments

One of the easiest ways to capture that classic black and white look when shooting an IR- converted SLR is to shoot in Monochrome mode. If your camera doesn’t offer that option, you’ll have to convert the image into black and white after the fact. That may be the better of the 2 choices because that approach will give you more control over how the final image looks.

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

"Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark, professionals built the Titanic."

While my quote of the month is from "anonymous," the subhead was a statement made by Ralph Waldo Emerson, who I think is of "Where's Waldo?" fame. In recent months, this column has featured some professional photographers who...

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Joe Farace Posted: Oct 21, 2011 Published: Sep 01, 2011 5 comments
Dick Stolley, who many consider Time-Life’s best managing editor, once told People magazine photographers that a successful image elicited a “Gasp Factor” from the viewer. Stolley believed that if the image stopped the reader, forced them to take a second look, read the headline, and perhaps the rest of the story, the photograph passed his test. Often the best photographs—those “Gasp Factor” ones—are made under less than ideal lighting conditions. These images are made on stormy days, at the crack of dawn, sunset, or in the dark of night when getting the proper exposure can be a distinct challenge. It is those precious fleeting minutes when the quality of light provides photographers with images that separate photographs from snapshots.