Newsletter

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Posted: Jul 29, 2008 0 comments

All Photos © 2008, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

The digital darkroom has made it simple to accomplish print and image effects
that would have taken hours in the chemical darkroom environment. While the
learning curve can be steep (as it certainly was for the chemical darkroom,
at least if you wanted good results) the ease with which some tasks can be accomplished
is almost...well, embarrassing, at least to those who once labored in the
amber-lit confines of the darkroom.

...

Filed under
Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Jan 31, 2006 0 comments


The bright blue sky used as a background for this shot contrasted
nicely with the pinkblossoms.

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 17, 2013 1 comments
Backgrounds are virtually as important as subjects in making a picture work. If they are messy and there is a lot going on, they tug at our eyes and pull our attention away from your subject. Just as you carefully consider your subjects, at the same time you need to carefully consider the background. For example, is it too light? Too messy? Too attention-grabbing? Does it have distracting lines or colors? Is it too sharp or too defined?
Filed under
Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Dec 27, 2005 0 comments


Classic portrait lighting isn't always necessary for capturing
interesting peoplepictures.

Filed under
Posted: Mar 29, 2011 3 comments

Emerging Beauty

Time Lapse Techniques Capture Miracles

by David FitzSimmons

My wife, Olivia, is a naturalist. In one of her educational programs, she teaches children about the life-cycle of monarch butterflies. To show their four stages of life, she begins by collecting eggs from milkweed plants. Olivia keeps leaves from...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

Now I know how stagecoach drivers felt when they saw those first rail lines
being laid over their routes. The recent announcement that Kodak would be discontinuing
their silver black and white papers didn't come as much as a shock as
an inevitability that one always hopes will not be manifest. With inventories
expected to last a few months, we're now witnessing the disappearance
of venerable brands such as Polycontrast IV, Azo and Polymax Fine Art, Kodabrome
II and Portra, even their "Digital Black and White" paper, which
was used for digital printers. According to a Kodak spokesperson, Kodak has
seen a cumulative drop in black and white paper buying of 25% per year over
the past few years and could no longer justify being in the market. We also
learned, by the way, that Kodak black and white papers had of late been produced
in Brazil, being packaged from rolls in Rochester. The spokesperson did stress,
however, that Kodak black and white film and chemistry was not on the chopping
block and that Kodak sees silver photography as still extremely viable.

...

Filed under
Posted: Oct 28, 2008 0 comments
Pictures displayed are bright and readable from a fairly wide angle from center, and having a 4 inch LCD means editing and perusing is easy on planes, trains and, when not driving,au...
Filed under
Posted: Nov 28, 2006 4 comments


Epson 3800

Well, it seems Epson heard this, and while the 4800 is stillavaila...

Filed under
Posted: Jun 30, 2009 2 comments

Equivalent Exposure

by George Schaub

Now we come to how ISO, aperture, and shutter speed relate to one another. They exist to balance the amount of light in the scene with the recording made by the sensor and ultimately made into an image file on the memory card. Your goal is to record the scene with as true and balanced a color and lightnessof...

Filed under
Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 07, 2005 0 comments

Until recently, few digital camera owners were able to make true wide angle
images because a 38mm focal length was the shortest available in built-in zooms.
(All focal lengths are discussed in 35mm format equivalent.) Today, an increasing
number of digicams include zooms that start at 28mm or even 24mm. Many of the
high-end cameras also accept 0.7x adapters, ideal for ultra wide angle photography.
And SLR system lens manufacturers have also started making incredibly short
zooms, such as 12-24mm, for a very wide angle of view. All of this is great
news for creative shooters who want to expand their visual horizons.


Most camera owners think of a wide angle lens as something that's
useful for including an entire landscape vista, street scene,
or a large group of people, in a single image. While that is one
valid reason for owning a wide angle lens, or a wide angle adapter
accessory, there are many others as discussed in the text. (28mm
equivalent.) Photo © 2005 Peter K. Burian.

...

Filed under
Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 17, 2013 0 comments
There are many fun and creative images you can create with flash if you allow yourself to think outside the box. In the past when we all shot film, we had to wait until the film came back from the lab to see the results. If the pictures weren’t what we wanted, we’d have to start over and figure out how to improve the images on the next roll of film.
Filed under
Moose Peterson Posted: Sep 10, 2013 0 comments
What makes us stop and say to ourselves, “There’s a photograph here!”? It really comes down to one element that is all around us—light. The play of light off objects, critters and people is what grabs the mind’s eye and makes us take note and sparks visual interest in the viewer. There are lots of processes that go into that final photograph to make it successful, yet none are as important as how we speak with light. And that’s all done through exposure.
Filed under
Posted: Nov 24, 2009 0 comments

Exposure Basics I

George Schaub

“Exposure” is shorthand for the delicate balance of the light sensitivity of the recording material (in our case the camera’s CCD or CMOS sensor with picture sites, known as pixels) with the amount of light in the scene. There are two parts of a camera system that control the amount of lightcomin...

Filed under
Posted: Jul 28, 2009 0 comments

Exposure Basics II

by George Schaub

Now we come to how exposure and creative photography go hand in hand.

Why would you need to change the aperture or shutter speed under different lighting conditions? Why would you want to use a fast shutter speed for one shot and a slow one for another? Why change apertures or ISO?

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading