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Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

December 2009

On The Cover
This month we are touting books as excellent gift items for the photographer(s) in your life. That said, we’ve provided you with the top photo and digital imaging books of 2009 to help with the selection process. We also have a vast array of optical options to expand your photographic view of the world. We...

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Staff Posted: Nov 21, 2011 Published: Dec 01, 2011 0 comments
On The Cover
Are you thinking of turning pro? You should go for it, but not until you read this issue first. Through our exclusive interview with Chase Jarvis and our Twitter tips for photographers, you’ll see there is a lot more to marketing yourself than in the past. Business aside, we have breaking tech news: a new archival DVD called the M-Disc. We also have tests on the latest pro equipment to help take your photography to new levels. Our cover shot, by Lindsay Adler, shows what you can accomplish with Broncolor’s Senso lighting kit for example.

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Posted: Dec 01, 2010 0 comments

December 2010

On The Cover
As per tradition, we’re sharing our picks of the top photo books of 2010. Some of our picks are instructional and some are simply for fun, but all illustrate the unique power these special books hold. Aside from books, we have an in-depth Test Report on the Panasonic Lumix G2, a compact system camera. Finally,b...

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Posted: Dec 01, 2006 1 comments

December
2006

On the
Cover


What's on the photo horizon? The answers as posed by our writers may surprise
you. Aside from looking into the future, we show you how to prevent and cure
dust problemsw...

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Posted: Apr 27, 2010 2 comments

Depth Of Field

Creative Focus Effects

by Jim Zuckerman

One of the most important concepts in photography, and one that you have to deal with every time you take a picture, is depth of field. Depth of field refers to how much of the scene is in focus in front of and behind the subject on which you’ve focused. Forexa...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 26, 2006 0 comments


All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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Howard Millard Posted: Jul 26, 2005 0 comments


The
original photo, shot in the studio with Paul C. Buff electronic
flash on Fujichrome Sensia slide film, is sharp throughout.
Model: Heidi McAllister.

Photos 2002, Howard Millard, All Rights Reserved

In ads, book covers and magazines,
you've seen pictures where part of the subject jumps out at you
because it's sharp, but most of the image is way out of focus. The
technique really directs your attention to the part of the subject that's
sharp, and it adds a contemporary flair and sense of style. Traditionally,
this effect was achieved by using extremely shallow depth of field with
a medium format or large view camera. Today, however, you can create it
digitally in a few minutes and apply it to any existing photo made with
any camera, or to any print that you can scan into your computer.



I
selected the area I want to keep sharp with the Elliptical
Marquee selection tool.

Remember, once you've drawn the selection, you can
reposition it by dragging inside the selected area. Next,
feather the selection.

...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Jan 21, 2014 0 comments
I have made the point that on-camera flash is not the most attractive artificial light for photography. In fact, I’d say it’s at or near the bottom of my list for choosing artificial light sources to illuminate the subjects I photograph. If I can’t take the flash off the camera and I’m forced to use on-camera flash, then the best approach is to diffuse the light. There are various ways to do this. Some diffusion techniques require a modest expenditure while others don’t cost anything.
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Posted: Feb 26, 2008 0 comments

Digital Black and White

By George Schaub



When digital arrived it hardly seemed a scheme that would be any good for my
black and white photography. I now see it as an essential part of the way I
work. This required some translation and transition from film and chemical photography,
but it also required aredefinitio...

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George Schaub Posted: May 24, 2005 0 comments

While the usual photographic rules, such as using shutter speed to portray motion
(slow to blur, fast to freeze) and using focal length, aperture and camera-to-subject
distance to create a certain depth of field apply to both film and digital photography,
digital offers some intriguing options for making camera settings. In some cases
these settings relate to film photography settings, or choosing a specific film
for its "personality", but with digital you can alter these settings
on every frame you shoot and not be restricted to the attributes of a particular
film you might have loaded in the camera.

...

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Posted: Jul 29, 2008 0 comments

Digital Help

by David B. Brooks

We are including a long response section from David Brooks' Digital Help
column in the newsletter this month as we wanted to get this information to
you as soon as possible. His response is to numerous letters he has recently
received on how to get prints that match the on-screenima...

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Grace Schaub Posted: Feb 28, 2006 0 comments

A Special Report from the PMA Show

Digital Image Sensor Update



The Promise of Even Better Image Quality Ahead

by George Schaub



In light of recent developments, and with products unveiled here at PMA, it's
clear that manufacturers are aiming their efforts at bringing outcameras...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 25, 2006 0 comments

Digital Image Sensor Update



The Promise of Even Better Image Quality Ahead



by George Schaub

All the talk in the past was about megapixels, with the horserace of ever-higher
counts grabbing all the headlines. Some folks claim that the latest 6 and 8
MP cameras deliver such good quality at such low price points that themegapixe...

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Joe Farace Posted: Aug 16, 2012 0 comments
A typical digital camera’s sensor sees a range of light in wavelengths from approximately 350 to 1000 nanometers. A nanometer (nm) is a metric unit of length equal to one billionth of a meter. Your eyes usually see a range of light from approximately 400 to 700 nanometers. Most digital cameras place a low pass filter directly in front of the imaging sensor to allow low frequency light visible to the human eye to pass through to the sensor. It blocks unwanted light from the infrared and ultraviolet spectrums (the high end and the low end wavelengths) from polluting a photograph’s color. As owners of early Leica M8 cameras quickly discovered, this piece of glass is very important for maintaining maximum color fidelity.
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Jim Zuckerman Posted: May 20, 2013 0 comments
When we all shot film and our exposures were not perfect, there was very little we could do about our mistakes. All that has changed, and now we can make meaningful adjustments to the contrast, exposure and the color cast. It is a great time to be a photographer.

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