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Staff  |  Dec 15, 2015  |  0 comments

THE GOODS is a new feature in Shutterbug that spotlights the hottest premium photo gear out there.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Sep 08, 2013  |  0 comments

If you’re long on artistic ambition but short on psychomotor skills (i.e., hand-eye coordination) like I am, SnapArt 3 from Alien Skin may liberate the Rembrandt hidden in you.

Joe Farace  |  May 01, 2018  |  1 comments

The following is something people tell me when I suggest using a plug-in or specialized software for enhancing or retouching portraits: “But you can do that in Photoshop!” That’s because when it comes to software for wedding, portrait, and boudoir photographs, everyone has an opinion—sometimes a strong one—even if they’re wrong.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Oct 15, 2018  |  0 comments

Along with previewing a cool new Photoshop on the iPad app that’s coming next year, Adobe also unveiled the new Photoshop CC 2019 image editing software today at the Adobe MAX conference in Los Angeles. One of the Adobe experts who’s already tried out Photoshop CC 2019 is Colin Smith of photoshopCAFE.

Dan Havlik  |  Oct 20, 2020  |  0 comments

It's happened. Adobe introduced a new version of its ground-breaking image editor today: Photoshop 2021. And, as usual, there's a lot to unpack in this feature-loaded imaging editing software from Adobe.

Dan Havlik  |  Feb 08, 2016  |  0 comments

There are some Photoshop tutorial videos out there that can be extremely helpful and there are some that can be extremely annoying. The humorous short clip below from Sugar Zaza shows precisely why some of them can drive us completely batty.

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 10, 2020  |  1 comments

What if there was one app that could fix the worst case of blur in a photo with just the click of a button? Well, there's a much-talked-about new piece of image software that promises to do just that and, according to a recent test by software guru Unmesh Dinda of PiXimperfect, it's surprisingly effective.

Joe Farace  |  Jul 30, 2012  |  First Published: Jun 01, 2012  |  0 comments

Tiffen’s Dfx 3.0 offers photographers software that can make their images stand out from the crowd. The bundle is a digital emulation of 2000 of the company’s glass filters that for convenience uses the same names of the company’s Soft/FX or Pro-Mist filters, so those who’ve shot with their filters in the past know exactly what to expect when applying their digital equivalents. For those who haven’t, rest assured that the company who made their name in filters knows their stuff. As a bonus, the software also includes effects created by lenses, lab processes, film grain, color correction, plus natural light effects.

 

I must confess that previous versions of Tiffen’s Dfx Digital Filter Suite, while interesting, did not make the final cut of power tools in my personal digital toolbox. All that’s changed in 3.0. It takes all of the good stuff from the previous versions, blends in new options, and wraps it around an interface that, while still containing a few less-than-elegant elements, retains its individuality and provides for smooth workflow.

George Schaub  |  Aug 29, 2014  |  0 comments

The Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) member magazines recently convened for their General Assembly to vote for the best photo and imaging products launched by the industry in the last 12 months. The voting took place during the General Assembly that was held in spring, 2014, in Vancouver, Canada.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 24, 2016  |  0 comments

Whoever said, “nothing is ever free” was dead wrong: Today you can download the latest Nik Collection of powerful image-editing software. Many of us love this suite for the simplicity it offers is getting the best out of our images. And now you can do so without spending a dime. 

Joe Farace  |  Aug 26, 2014  |  0 comments

The most important tip I would like to share about travel photography is never buy a new camera or lens before traveling to Bhutan or even Carhenge. The next most essential travel photography secret is that using your equipment has to be instinctive; when a photo op presents itself you may only have a few seconds to get a shot. There’s no time to think about what menu to use or how to turn on continuous AF, or what exposure mode you’re in. Using your camera has to be instinctive; you should see—or even anticipate—then click the shutter. It’ll make travel more fun, too.

George Schaub  |  Feb 27, 2014  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2014  |  0 comments

There are many ways to share images these days, from social networks to clouds to full-fledged e-commerce platforms. For some, simple online albuming will do, but for others it can become an involving project that puts your images on the Internet in a very engaging way. It’s not only in the personalization of the look and feel of the wrapper around your image content that can separate your site from the crowd. It’s also the ability to work cross-platform, include an e-commerce component, and allow for a “translator” that can make your site accessible to folks and even clients around the world that can add to its attractiveness and functionality.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 18, 2017  |  0 comments

Many photographers use visible watermarks on the images they post online or license through stock photo agencies as a means of protecting their copyrights and preventing the unauthorized use of their work. Yet in a newly released blog post, researchers at Google say that automated algorithms can erase this protection and provide unfettered access to watermarked images.

Ron Leach  |  Feb 28, 2017  |  0 comments

Everyone wants to create dramatic images with vibrant, natural colors that "pop.” And as you’ll see in the video below, there’s a bit more involved in making impactful photos than simply dragging the saturation slider to the right.

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