Scanner News

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Shutterbug Staff  |  Aug 22, 2017  |  0 comments

Canon just unveiled five new Pixma TS-series wireless inkjet all-in-one photo printers. The Pixma TS9120, TS8120, TS6120, TS5120 and TS3120 printers offer a variety of features, including photo printing, copying, and scanning, in relatively sleek, compact bodies.

George Schaub  |  Aug 17, 2017  |  0 comments

Think of a scanner as an archivist and a digital recording device for both prints and film images. Next think of a scanner as a kind of large format copying device and even a camera. Now put those together and you’ll get an idea of what Epson’s new 12000XL scanner has to offer. 

Shutterbug Staff  |  Jun 21, 2017  |  0 comments

Welcome to our newest photography video series: the Shutterbug Showcase. In these videos, we’ll be doing hands-on demonstrations of some of the hottest photo gear on the market right now. For our first Shutterbug Showcase clip, we’re looking at the Epson FastFoto FF-640, which is the world’s fastest photo scanner.

Ron Leach  |  Nov 21, 2016  |  0 comments

If you have shoeboxes of old prints in your closet, and no scanner to digitize them, Google’s new PhotoScan app may be just what you’re looking for. Available free for both iOS and Android, the simple app lets you digitize prints using your phone or tablet.

George Schaub  |  Sep 15, 2016  |  0 comments

Today Epson introduced the FastFoto FF-640, dubbed by the company as the “world’s fastest photo scanner.” An alternative to flatbed scanners, the FastFoto scanner has a throughput rate of one photo per second with integral photo tools to restore and archive treasured images for print or social media sharing. Ideal for hobbyists and archivists alike, the unit can handle prints up to 8x10 as well as speedy document scanning for those who want to make electronic files of important papers. Shutterbug Editor-at-Large George Schaub got his hands on a pre-release unit and filed this report.

Ron Leach  |  Aug 29, 2016  |  0 comments

If you’re one of those photographers with shoe boxes full of medium format negatives and can’t afford an expensive film scanner to digitize them, here’s a simple solution: Dump out one of those shoe boxes and turn it into a scanner using the ingenious (and cheap) method provided in the following video.

Jon Sienkiewicz  |  Jun 24, 2016  |  1 comments

No, we’re not cooking color slides and film negatives in a pop-up toaster like Eggo waffles. The FilmToaster is a device that enables you to create digital image files from virtually any size film or transparency up to 4x5. You supply the DSLR and macro lens. If you have a shoebox full of family negs like many of us do, prepare to bring those old images back to life. 

George Schaub  |  May 15, 2015  |  4 comments

Epson announced two new scanners last year for those who want to archive their film files and/or create wall-worthy prints from their negatives and slides. The Epson Perfection V800 Photo and V850 Pro allow for scanning all sizes up to 4x5 inches using the supplied frames, and up to 8x10 inches without them, including creating contact sheets. While the V850 Pro is the subject of this review, I’ll outline features and differences between the two as we go.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 11, 2014  |  0 comments

Are you itching to digitize your film-based medium format images? HP Marketing Corp. is now offering the new Braun FS 120 medium format scanner designed for that exact task.

George Schaub  |  Jan 03, 2014  |  0 comments

This is a portrait of my Great-Uncle Syl, taken in the late 1940’s, a print that sat in a storage box until last year. Now Syl’s on the web here, shared with family via an e-mail attachment, and will soon be part of a photo book of the family history. If you’ve got boxes of old photos it’s easy to share them too. For those thinking about such a project, and who haven’t scanned before, here are some basic FAQ’s that might get you started.

George Schaub  |  Nov 08, 2013  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Designed for professionals, enthusiasts, schools, and clubs, the OpticFilm 120 scanner from Plustek ($1999) can handle negative and positive film, including 35mm filmstrips, individual 35mm slides, and medium format film up to 6x12cm format. The scanner contains an eight-element glass lens and can deliver up to 10,600dpi optical resolution, with a claimed 4.01 dynamic range using the supplied SilverFast software’s Multi-Exposure function. The tabletop scanner is about the size of a six-slice restaurant toaster (about 8x14.5x7.5”) and is supplied with a complete set of very well-constructed film holders, an IT8 calibration target, and a full version (not a trial) of SilverFast Ai Studio 8 software.

David B. Brooks  |  Feb 01, 2011  |  0 comments

A new CanoScan flat-bed photo scanner, the 9000F, has an exceptionally high 9600x9600 optical resolution. It’s priced right, with a list of $249, but how well does it work and what quality of scans does it reproduce from 35mm film?

David B. Brooks  |  Oct 01, 2010  |  1 comments

Scanning is most effective when hardware and software work together. It’s a bit like some black-and-white film developers that mix Metol and hydroquinone for a super-additive outcome.

David B. Brooks  |  Sep 01, 2010  |  13 comments

I’ve been testing and reporting on film scanners for almost 20 years, and names like Imacon, Kodak, Nikon, Microtek, and UMAX all come to mind.

Jon Canfield  |  Jan 01, 2010  |  0 comments

I decided to take a look at two new AiO devices, the Canon PIXMA MP980 and the HP Photosmart Premium Fax All-in-One to see how they did with photo printing and scanning—two functions that any photographer needs.

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