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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

The Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM (16-35mm equivalent in 35mm parlance) was designed to cover the APS-C format, specifically the EOS 20D and both EOS Digital Rebels (plus future APS-C models). Canon's EF-S lenses (S = Short Back Focus) are physically matched to these cameras. This design also results in a smaller and lighter lens (3.5" long and less than 14 oz).

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

If I could, I'd spend all my time hunting down bugs and lizards and any other critters small enough to fit inside a macro lens. Simply stated, I love macro. So I couldn't wait to put the new EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens through its paces on my Canon EOS 20D digital SLR.

 

As you may already know, EF-S is Canon's designation for APS-C-dedicated lenses...

Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2008 4 comments

I've been a long-time proponent of Canon Speedlites, and also an avid follower of Metz flashes. I always liked the Metz for its sturdy quality and reliability--I'd owned a Metz potato masher (handlemount, in the old vernacular). But when I switched to the Canon EOS system, I became a devout Canon shoe-mount advocate, finding these flashes dependable and robust. I...

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 10, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 5 comments

Capture One Pro stands as the Raw converter and digital asset manager of choice among many pro photographers, notably those using Phase One backs. But this software also supports many, many other cameras, with profiles for over 250 models plus a wide range of lenses. Version 7 (V7) has some new features of note, so I checked it out to see if an upgrade from 6 is advisable, and if it might tempt users of Adobe Lightroom/ACR. For this test I ran Capture One Pro 7 on a 27” iMac under OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, with 8GB of RAM.

Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2004 0 comments

These days, with security tight and carryon bag restrictions even tighter, all photographers face a dilemma. In the old days you could check your cameras, albeit in very strong and secure cases, and even lock them up so no one could get their hands on your...

Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 28, 2015 0 comments

Just as the celebrities he photographs have to reinvent themselves for every role, Patrick Ecclesine is constantly putting on new hats as a photographer.

“As photographers, we have to remember what got us here today may not work tomorrow, in the sense that we constantly have to reinvent ourselves,” Ecclesine astutely affirms. “As a photographer, you’re there to capture a moment. Well, moments change, life changes, things evolve, and so you have to be open to that and not rest on your laurels or get stuck in your ways.”

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 15, 2006 Published: Dec 01, 2006 3 comments

Changing lenses on a digital SLR subjects the interior to invasion by dust and other airborne particles. While we can avoid the problem with prudent handling, eventually we'll have to face the facts: dust will get on the sensor. The imaging sensor, whether CCD or CMOS, is a dust magnet. As soon as the camera is turned on the sensor becomes electrostatically charged. Any...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 20, 2015 0 comments

San Francisco-based commercial photographer Mark Holthusen is constantly reinventing himself, rarely sitting still, except for the occasional interview. When he’s not shooting ads for one client or another using the latest photo and video gear, he’s creating theatrical productions or embarking on personal, photojournalistic projects, always seeking new outlets for his creativity.

Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 28, 2012 Published: Nov 01, 2012 3 comments

Gitzo turned the tripod world upside down—literally—when the company first introduced the Traveler, a true travel tripod. This lightweight carbon-fiber support was unusual for its inverted, contortionist-like design, where the legs fold back 180 degrees on themselves and the leg tips hug the ball head, making it more compact.

Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 20, 2015 0 comments

Jim Karageorge has been an eyewitness to the changing face of corporate photography over the years. “Today, the stories that corporate clients want to tell are different from those we told in the past,” Karageorge, a corporate/industrial photographer, observes. “They are geared more toward the human factor than the technologies.”

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