Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

It is rare that I have so much fun using studio strobes. But such was the case with the Interfit cyberFLASH 300 ($449.99) and digitFLASH 1000 ($899.00) lights from Paterson Photographic, rated respectively at 300 and 1000 ws. And the battery-driven eFLASH...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

I 'll admit to it--ever since I was first introduced to the Interfit flat panel strobes a few short years back, I've become enamored of this company's products. And I still use those lights. Every year since, Interfit would introduce new lighting gear, but these newer monolights were either too big or too basic for my needs. Then along came the EXD200.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

A monolight makes entering the world of studio flash photography as painless as possible. Before long you’ll find that this studio strobe will be as easy to use as your shoe-mount flash (perhaps easier) and provide undreamt of creative possibilities. Some monolights make the transition much easier. Enter the digital Interfit Stellar XD.

The Stellar XD is a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 06, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 7 comments
There are a number of new lenses, including those for “full-frame,” Micro Four Thirds, and “mirrorless” compact system cameras debuting this year, listed in alphabetical order. Here’s a sampler, with a sprinkling of filters thrown in for good measure. We’ve shown prices when available at press time—if not, check the websites of the companies for updates.
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Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In a career spanning 40 years, Jeff Smith's work as an industrial and corporate photographer is well-known to many. Not too long ago we'd find him going to a job site with literally almost a half-ton of lighting gear, along with a Mamiya RZ67 and heavy lenses, not to mention countless packs of film and Polaroids. Over the years the market has shifted, technology has...

Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 24, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 5 comments
You have lots of stuff ready for sale or that needs to be catalogued, such as jewelry, watches, pottery, tableware, glassware, figurines, coins, or maybe even an old camera. So how do you photograph these items quickly and affordably, while making them look their best?

For starters, we often need soft, largely even, and, for the most part, shadowless illumination to bring out all the salient features in the item. While a light tent or other diffusion enclosure can be used, getting lighting ratios just right can prove time-consuming. Using household lighting is often unsatisfactory if you want to make the item sparkle so that it beats out any competitive offerings online, and especially if you want the pictures to reflect an air of professionalism. Besides, color balance is often an issue, made even more difficult when available fluorescent lighting is used. And if you use flash, you’ll need more than one strobe, which becomes a costly and often time-consuming proposition.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2010 2 comments

New fluorescent and LED “cool” lights are on the scene, making serious headway into the realm of digital photography. Cool lights not only save energy, but they may be better suited in a variety of situations.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

The digital camera in your hands provides you with loads of technology. It allows you to bracket automatically in a series of three or even five exposures, depending on model and user settings. But given the limited space on a memory card (notably when shooting raw at high pixel counts), the time spent to shoot all those frames, the limited buffer memory that you might fill up in...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

You might think that the sophisticated metering system in your camera is the be all and end all when it comes to exposure. The truth is, it does deliver remarkable results, but it can only take you so far. Want to tackle high-contrast scenes or tricky lighting or tonal situations without wasting a lot of time bracketing? Then you'll need a handheld meter. Shooting studio...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

There’s an old saying that putting a new lens on your camera is like putting on a fresh pair of eyes. The latest lenses increasingly offer the ability to shoot in lower light without having to raise the ISO beyond quality limits, thanks to wider maximum apertures; shoot wider angles of view with APS-Csensor-size cameras; and allow for perspective control right in the camera.

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