Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 08, 2012 Published: Jul 01, 2012 1 comments

Attempting to make the HDR process more user-friendly, the newly updated HDR Expose and Photoshop-dedicated plug-in 32 Float, now both in Version 2, largely share the same features and enhancements. As I see it, the improvements center mainly on workflow—reason enough to upgrade, in my opinion, and reason enough to consider these as serious tools for HDR work. Both are available from Unified Color Technologies.

Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 08, 2014 0 comments

The goal in HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging is to recapture the full tonal range that you saw in the scene, despite dynamic range limitations of the camera sensor. Previously, HDR technique generally involved use of a tripod: now, while it is still advisable, it may become an option. It also required a static scene totally devoid of movement. Any movement resulted in misalignment and ghosting, or secondary images, caused by a shift in camera position or of moving objects from frame to frame.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 19, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 8 comments
The merge to HDR process has for too long been a mystery wrapped inside an enigma. That cloak of mystery is one giant step closer to being removed thanks to HDR Express, from Unified Color Technologies (www.unifiedcolor.com). While this software greatly simplifies the process, successful HDR merges don’t just happen when you click a button. There is some planning involved.
Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 17, 2015 0 comments

Hospitality photography focuses on hotels, resorts, and casinos but it’s not just about capturing luxury accommodations and lush exterior shots of surrounding vistas and scenery. It’s as much about highlighting comfort, relaxation, and fun. The pictures may include special dishes prepared by gourmet chefs, waiters serving tables, and guests enjoying the ambience and amenities. It’s a smorgasbord of images designed to appeal to a wide range of tastes, albeit presented with an air of sophistication to make any potential guest feel like a prince or princess upon arrival.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

When I shot film, I carried a number of glass filters in my camera bag to every destination. And since I was shooting slide film, I needed the effect then and there—I didn’t depend on post-processing. Now that I’m shooting digital, one would think that I no longer needed glass filters. Well, that’s a misguided notion. There is always at least one filter in my camera bag: a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The digital image age has raised many questions and concerns about the safety and protection of precious image files.

Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 02, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 4 comments

CES is not a big imaging software show as evidenced by the short list of new products, though we did find a new camera profiling tool, updated monitor calibration tools, an old favorite Raw converter brought back to life under a new name, and software for editing on the fly and sharing photos.

 

ArcSoft introduced a Mac version of Perfect365. This software uses advanced facial recognition technology for one-click portrait touch-ups, letting you effortlessly adjust up to 21 individual facial features. Perfect365 allows you to add creative effects such as eye shadows, blushes, lipsticks, colored contact lenses, under-eye circle removal, and blemish removal. The software is available as a free download (www.perfect365.com) or in a premium edition ($39).

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

The obvious big news at this year's show was the "proliferation" of pigmented ink-based printers--and with that comes a new level of inks and print longevity. We used to think that pigmented inks could not deliver the color saturation and punch of dye-based inks, but that no longer appears to be the case with this new generation of inksets with expanded...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2004 0 comments

It is rare that I have so much fun using studio strobes. But such was the case with the Interfit cyberFLASH 300 ($449.99) and digitFLASH 1000 ($899.00) lights from Paterson Photographic, rated respectively at 300 and 1000 ws. And the battery-driven eFLASH...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

I 'll admit to it--ever since I was first introduced to the Interfit flat panel strobes a few short years back, I've become enamored of this company's products. And I still use those lights. Every year since, Interfit would introduce new lighting gear, but these newer monolights were either too big or too basic for my needs. Then along came the EXD200.

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