Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

The digital camera in your hands provides you with loads of technology. It allows you to bracket automatically in a series of three or even five exposures, depending on model and user settings. But given the limited space on a memory card (notably when shooting raw at high pixel counts), the time spent to shoot all those frames, the limited buffer memory that you might fill up in...

Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

You might think that the sophisticated metering system in your camera is the be all and end all when it comes to exposure. The truth is, it does deliver remarkable results, but it can only take you so far. Want to tackle high-contrast scenes or tricky lighting or tonal situations without wasting a lot of time bracketing? Then you'll need a handheld meter. Shooting studio...

Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 23, 2016 0 comments

Documentary photography, street photography, photojournalism, news photography, the photo essay—at their best, each records moments in time where man, nature, or machine impacts the surrounding universe. Centered in Rochester, New York, George Eastman, the man, and Eastman Kodak, the company, changed the universe around them as they rose to prominence. And when Eastman Kodak fell, a tidal wave broke on the shoulders of a city and its people.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

There’s an old saying that putting a new lens on your camera is like putting on a fresh pair of eyes. The latest lenses increasingly offer the ability to shoot in lower light without having to raise the ISO beyond quality limits, thanks to wider maximum apertures; shoot wider angles of view with APS-Csensor-size cameras; and allow for perspective control right in the camera.

 

...

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 27, 2016 0 comments

Joe McNally learned the value of supplementing available light with flash early on in his career as a photojournalist. Currently a Nikon Ambassador who works mainly as a commercial/editorial portrait photographer, McNally has become a staunch advocate for the use of Nikon Speedlights on location, often using these small flashes off camera in multiple lighting setups. McNally even mixes his Speedlights with studio strobes on occasion when the situation warrants.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2004 0 comments

With the immense popularity of online sales and auctions, the need to show off those goods to advantage becomes increasingly important. In fact, eBay (ebay.com), the most popular site for such activities, provides some basic tips, which focus on proper lighting and suitable backgrounds. While...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2003 2 comments

Lighting And Supports

Everywhere you turn in Las Vegas, there are lights flashing, or should we say, flashy lights? And while the Las Vegas Convention Center was not awash in the bright, showy lights of the Strip, still the lights of photography shone in their own small way. As did tripods...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

Whether it’s shoe-mount strobe or studio lighting, accessories of all shapes and sizes appear to be on the rise.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 18, 2013 Published: Sep 01, 2013 0 comments

This year has seen many new introductions in lighting gear for all photographers. Auxiliary and accessory lighting can make a big difference in your work. Here, reporter Jack Neubart gives us a sampling of products he found at trade shows that caught his eye. For more information on the companies whose products he mentions we encourage you to explore their websites to discover their full offerings in this category plus check www.shutterbug.com for lighting gear tests. We’ve provided a full list of contact information at the end of the article.—Editor

Jack Neubart Posted: May 10, 2016 0 comments

Jim Harmer didn’t start out as a travel and nature photographer. He was in law school when the photography bug bit him, and, before he knew it, he was traveling the world, capturing moments in time with his camera.

Pages