Jack Neubart

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2008 2 comments

Twenty years in business together, the team of Bohm-Marrazzo (Montclair, New Jersey-- www.bohm-marrazzo.com) comes well equipped to tackle the challenge of photographing kids and animals for their advertising clients. Experience has taught them to incorporate these highly animated subjects into the picture to make an...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

You can go your entire life using a 35mm SLR and its built-in flash without ever buying an accessory electronic flash unit. If you don't mind compromise. The built-in flash takes fairly long to recycle and may not be ready when you are...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

I love photo backpacks. They support the load by means of a shoulder harness system, usually aided by a chest (sternum) strap and often a waist belt so you arrive at your destination no worse for wear. They're great for nature hikes as well as general travel.

I decided to test out a number of them to see how they would fit and perform for the traveling...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

The new crop this year displays some innovatively sensible thinking, especially where backpacks are concerned.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: May 20, 2015 0 comments

There was a time when I’d avoid a zoom lens as much as I’d avoid a swarm of midges. But in the digital age, the zoom lens has taken on new purpose, at least for me. Midges, however, are still a pest that is best avoided—especially when you’re changing lenses. And if you’re out in a marsh shooting spectacular scenic views, the Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM lens gives you the needed range of focal lengths so you can reign supreme over any landscape, as you avoid changing lenses while sidestepping concern that those midges will infiltrate your camera.

Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 13, 2015 0 comments

I was really excited to get my hands on Canon’s latest G-series camera, the PowerShot G7 X. In fact, I was looking for this camera to replace my current point-and-shoot because I’d wanted something that was still pocket-size, but with Raw capture, a feature lacking in my own camera. And the G7 X was a more economical alternative to a mirrorless model, which would also tempt me with its array of extra lenses and accessories.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

The expansive coverage of a 14mm lens may be more than you think you need. But you'd be surprised to discover that it reveals a world of possibilities that might otherwise escape you. While it certainly is ideal when shooting in open country, a super-wide lens can do wonders in tight quarters. To check out this lens, and along the way explore the potential of this focal...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

The Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM (16-35mm equivalent in 35mm parlance) was designed to cover the APS-C format, specifically the EOS 20D and both EOS Digital Rebels (plus future APS-C models). Canon's EF-S lenses (S = Short Back Focus) are physically matched to these cameras. This design also results in a smaller and lighter lens (3.5" long and less than 14 oz).

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2006 0 comments

If I could, I'd spend all my time hunting down bugs and lizards and any other critters small enough to fit inside a macro lens. Simply stated, I love macro. So I couldn't wait to put the new EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens through its paces on my Canon EOS 20D digital SLR.

 

As you may already know, EF-S is Canon's designation for APS-C-dedicated lenses...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Feb 01, 2008 4 comments

I've been a long-time proponent of Canon Speedlites, and also an avid follower of Metz flashes. I always liked the Metz for its sturdy quality and reliability--I'd owned a Metz potato masher (handlemount, in the old vernacular). But when I switched to the Canon EOS system, I became a devout Canon shoe-mount advocate, finding these flashes dependable and robust. I...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading