Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

“Most of the photo equipment that I use is rented,” says Atlanta, Georgia-based pro photographer David Stuart (www.davidstuart.net). “I don’t even own that much gear to begin with.”

For most of his assignments, Stuart prefers a Hasselblad H2 with a Phase One P 45+ back...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

"The Great Swamp was a treat," observed one of the photographers from the American Museum of Natural History's photo studio after returning from a trip to photograph this New Jersey marshland. "Nothing like slogging around in chest waders and dodging mosquitoes (unsuccessfully, I might add) for four hours in really nice smelling swamp water," he...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 04, 2011 Published: Apr 01, 2011 5 comments

Automotive photography involves more than cars, although these vehicles make up the bulk of this genre. Automotive can also mean motorcycles and practically any motorized conveyance that hits the road. Tackling these vehicles may appear overwhelming at first, but not to veteran automotive photographer Richard Izui.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

“I can trace my roots in photography back to when I was a student at the Ontario College of Art (Toronto),” Andrew Eccles recalls. “But there was one problem: back then, I found it intimidating to approach people with the camera, so I avoided photographing them.

“Then I came to New York and started studying magazines such as Rolling Stone, and, through a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Shooting professionally since the 1970s, San Diego-based Marshall Harrington (www.marshallharrington.com) has employed various processes and techniques, film and digital, that give him a competitive edge. In my book, Location Lighting Solutions (Amphoto), Harrington described his work as “visual semiotics,” explaining...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just as we view flare as non-image-forming light that detracts from a photograph, we can think of digital noise as non-image-forming picture elements (pixels) that detract from a digital image. We tend to look at digital noise as a nuisance, like bats in the attic. And we want to be rid of the problems as quickly and painlessly as possible while doing the least amount of damage.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

It wasn't too long ago that Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) technology was all the rage in rechargeable batteries--until someone discovered that the heavy metals are an environmental nightmare. As a result, many companies switched over to Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), or Nickel Hydride for short (NiHy), which is arguably more environmentally friendly. NiCd battery systems are...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 29, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 0 comments
Many of us use the speedlight’s built-in kicker panel to add catchlights to the eyes and thereby give the subject a more animated look. Regrettably, this built-in device plays a marginal role in filling in shadows. So we turn to much larger, more functional bounce panels, and although they offer distinct advantages, these third-party panels may not be as flexible as we’d like. Enter Rogue FlashBenders from ExpoImaging (www.expoimaging.com). These panels quite literally lend a unique twist to speedlight photography.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 16, 2013 1 comments
There are two types of fisheye: circular and diagonal. The Rokinon 8mm f/3.5 Aspherical Fisheye Lens is of the diagonal type, delivering a rectangular image with cropped-sensor lenses. The lens I worked with is designed for the Nikon DX (APS-C/cropped) sensor. The APS-C version provides a 180-degree field of view. Other versions are available for other “cropped-sensor” interchangeable-lens cameras, including Micro Four Thirds. My tests were conducted using the Nikon D300.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2009 0 comments

Sometimes you need something other than a backpack or shoulder bag for your camera gear, and that leads us to the rolling camera case.

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