Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 20, 2013 Published: Aug 01, 2013 1 comments
“I have a mantra that I live by,” states San Diego-based Tim Tadder. “I believe that I work with the best clients in the world, and that they demand the best out of me. If the job calls for equipment I don’t have, I’ll make sure that I have it available so that I’m delivering the best product I can.”
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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

How do you photograph a duck pumping gas? When Aflac came to New York advertising photographer Chris Collins with just such a dilemma, this problem solver had the answer and years of experience to back him up. One duck was a given: they'd use a very sophisticated puppet designed (and finessed over the years) by noted Hollywood model-maker Stan Winston. But they'd also...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2010 1 comments

Chris Vincent knows how to make a splashy shot for his clients. When it comes to liquids—pours, spills, splashes, and explosions—Chris Vincent (www.cvincent.com) has done it. That and the more sedate still life studies where all is quiet and calm.

I met Vincent years back when he was...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

One moment you can find him photographing people diving off a boat in Bali, the next focusing on a businesswoman returning to a hotel restaurant in Bangkok to savor the haute cuisine, and then back in his studio capturing a telling portrait. That’s the life of an advertising photographer specializing in portraiture, lifestyle, and fashion, as David Allan Brandt knows it.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2010 0 comments

“Most of the photo equipment that I use is rented,” says Atlanta, Georgia-based pro photographer David Stuart (www.davidstuart.net). “I don’t even own that much gear to begin with.”

For most of his assignments, Stuart prefers a Hasselblad H2 with a Phase One P 45+ back...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

"The Great Swamp was a treat," observed one of the photographers from the American Museum of Natural History's photo studio after returning from a trip to photograph this New Jersey marshland. "Nothing like slogging around in chest waders and dodging mosquitoes (unsuccessfully, I might add) for four hours in really nice smelling swamp water," he...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 04, 2011 Published: Apr 01, 2011 5 comments

Automotive photography involves more than cars, although these vehicles make up the bulk of this genre. Automotive can also mean motorcycles and practically any motorized conveyance that hits the road. Tackling these vehicles may appear overwhelming at first, but not to veteran automotive photographer Richard Izui.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

“I can trace my roots in photography back to when I was a student at the Ontario College of Art (Toronto),” Andrew Eccles recalls. “But there was one problem: back then, I found it intimidating to approach people with the camera, so I avoided photographing them.

“Then I came to New York and started studying magazines such as Rolling Stone, and, through a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Shooting professionally since the 1970s, San Diego-based Marshall Harrington (www.marshallharrington.com) has employed various processes and techniques, film and digital, that give him a competitive edge. In my book, Location Lighting Solutions (Amphoto), Harrington described his work as “visual semiotics,” explaining...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just as we view flare as non-image-forming light that detracts from a photograph, we can think of digital noise as non-image-forming picture elements (pixels) that detract from a digital image. We tend to look at digital noise as a nuisance, like bats in the attic. And we want to be rid of the problems as quickly and painlessly as possible while doing the least amount of damage.

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