Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2010 1 comments

“I can trace my roots in photography back to when I was a student at the Ontario College of Art (Toronto),” Andrew Eccles recalls. “But there was one problem: back then, I found it intimidating to approach people with the camera, so I avoided photographing them.

“Then I came to New York and started studying magazines such as Rolling Stone, and, through a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2009 0 comments

Shooting professionally since the 1970s, San Diego-based Marshall Harrington (www.marshallharrington.com) has employed various processes and techniques, film and digital, that give him a competitive edge. In my book, Location Lighting Solutions (Amphoto), Harrington described his work as “visual semiotics,” explaining...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

Just as we view flare as non-image-forming light that detracts from a photograph, we can think of digital noise as non-image-forming picture elements (pixels) that detract from a digital image. We tend to look at digital noise as a nuisance, like bats in the attic. And we want to be rid of the problems as quickly and painlessly as possible while doing the least amount of damage.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2006 0 comments

It wasn't too long ago that Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) technology was all the rage in rechargeable batteries--until someone discovered that the heavy metals are an environmental nightmare. As a result, many companies switched over to Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), or Nickel Hydride for short (NiHy), which is arguably more environmentally friendly. NiCd battery systems are...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 29, 2011 Published: Jul 01, 2011 0 comments
Many of us use the speedlight’s built-in kicker panel to add catchlights to the eyes and thereby give the subject a more animated look. Regrettably, this built-in device plays a marginal role in filling in shadows. So we turn to much larger, more functional bounce panels, and although they offer distinct advantages, these third-party panels may not be as flexible as we’d like. Enter Rogue FlashBenders from ExpoImaging (www.expoimaging.com). These panels quite literally lend a unique twist to speedlight photography.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 16, 2013 1 comments

There are two types of fisheye: circular and diagonal. The Rokinon 8mm f/3.5 Aspherical Fisheye Lens is of the diagonal type, delivering a rectangular image with cropped-sensor lenses. The lens I worked with is designed for the Nikon DX (APS-C/cropped) sensor. The APS-C version provides a 180-degree field of view. Other versions are available for other “cropped-sensor” interchangeable-lens cameras, including Micro Four Thirds. My tests were conducted using the Nikon D300.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2009 0 comments

Sometimes you need something other than a backpack or shoulder bag for your camera gear, and that leads us to the rolling camera case.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 13, 2012 2 comments
For those who travel far and wide there’s nothing to beat the convenience and comfort of a roller camera case. With a roller in tow, instead of a heavy pack on your back or a bag hanging off your shoulder, you’re likely to arrive feeling less fatigued. In this roundup we’ll take a look at a good sampling of roller bags that are especially constructed for photographers.
Jack Neubart Posted: Jan 01, 2005 0 comments

My friend's 3-year-old opened her beauty shop in her parents' home. First mommy and daddy got their makeup and manicures. Then it was my turn. But who was going to take the pictures? Well, I put the camera in her dad's hands--first time he'd seen it, let alone operate this digital camera. I knew him to be a good photographer, but also knew that untried...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

“Understanding the genres, history, and style of the music is a huge part of my success,” John Scarpati observes. “I work very closely with the bands and artists to make sure the cover art reflects what they want to say.” Scarpati (www.scarpati.com), as he prefers to be called (“when someone yells Scarpati on set...

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