Jack Neubart

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2010 0 comments

Every manufacturer has a slightly different take on how to do it and David Honl has come up with his own original solutions in the form of some nifty and very portable light shapers that fit practically any shoe-mount flash without recourse to special adapters.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Collapsible light tents of various sizes and configurations have been all the rage of late. The precursor to many of these designs is the sweep table. Now, JTL has brought back this stalwart still life/small product shooting table in high style, adding portability and fairly easy setup.

Conventional sweep tables are usually set up and left in a corner of your studio...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

I 'm always looking for new solutions to light small things. Change that. I'm always looking for easier and faster solutions to light small things. Let's face it: lighting tabletops is never easy, although you'd think it should be. And sometimes, formulaic lighting is exactly what's needed. Then along comes the Gem eBox, from MK Digital Direct.

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

Untitled Document

Guide Number (Standard Illumination Pattern, ISO 100) At 35/200mm Zoom...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2009 0 comments

Nikon’s Speedlight SB-900 takes over the reins from the SB-800 as the company’s flagship dedicated shoe-mount strobe.

Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I've had many opportunities to work with battery-operated studio strobe systems. My problem with them was that they were heavy and bulky, not powerful enough, or simply too costly. Then I came upon the Opus Pro OPL-L300 location kit. I immediately noted that the 300 ws monolights were compact. Then I hefted the battery pack. Hmm, not bad, I thought. I could actually carry...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 09, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 1 comments
“Whether the client is advertising a travel destination or a product, such as clothing or sports apparel, I strive to set up the shoot with talent that’s the best fit for the ad,” lifestyle photographer Dennis Welsh proclaims. “That’s what makes the shot and the client’s message believable. That’s what sells it to potential customers. For instance, if I’m shooting for a ski company or a ski resort, I want to find skiers who can easily do what I want them to do. That conveys a sense of truth and honesty. If you start with skiers who are not convincing, you start with a deficit. In that case, you have to do the best you can with what you’ve got. If I’ve got great talent and a great location, a lot of things are already working in my favor.”
Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

I developed a love for fisheyes way back when I was shooting film. In fact, when I took the digital route, the first new lens I bought for my brand-new Canon EOS 5D was a fisheye.

I figured, what better way to celebrate my purchase of a full-frame D-SLR than with a lens that could take full advantage of the larger sensor! So now, fast forward to the purchase of a...

Filed under
Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

The mid-range zoom I started with when I bought my Nikon D300 was no speed demon, and I was hankering for an f/2.8 lens in the (effective) 70-200mm range. What first attracted me to the Tokina AT-X 535 PRO DX was the fast, constant maximum aperture, providing a bright view every step of the way. What’s more, the barrel on this tele-zoom does not rotate when zoomed: all movement is entirely...

Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 05, 2014 0 comments

One of the hottest categories these days are so-called “tough” cameras. They’re able to handle the elements on hikes and climbs made by hardy souls, are ideal for divers who want to record the wonders of the (fairly) deep, and are excellent choices for less arduous adventures, like a sunset stroll on a wind-blown Caribbean beach where a more delicate and expensive DSLR might be at risk. All can handle the rough and tumble of life where no mobile phone dares tread.

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading