Jack Neubart

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 09, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 1 comments
“Whether the client is advertising a travel destination or a product, such as clothing or sports apparel, I strive to set up the shoot with talent that’s the best fit for the ad,” lifestyle photographer Dennis Welsh proclaims. “That’s what makes the shot and the client’s message believable. That’s what sells it to potential customers. For instance, if I’m shooting for a ski company or a ski resort, I want to find skiers who can easily do what I want them to do. That conveys a sense of truth and honesty. If you start with skiers who are not convincing, you start with a deficit. In that case, you have to do the best you can with what you’ve got. If I’ve got great talent and a great location, a lot of things are already working in my favor.”
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Jack Neubart Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

I developed a love for fisheyes way back when I was shooting film. In fact, when I took the digital route, the first new lens I bought for my brand-new Canon EOS 5D was a fisheye.

I figured, what better way to celebrate my purchase of a full-frame D-SLR than with a lens that could take full advantage of the larger sensor! So now, fast forward to the purchase of a...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

The mid-range zoom I started with when I bought my Nikon D300 was no speed demon, and I was hankering for an f/2.8 lens in the (effective) 70-200mm range. What first attracted me to the Tokina AT-X 535 PRO DX was the fast, constant maximum aperture, providing a bright view every step of the way. What’s more, the barrel on this tele-zoom does not rotate when zoomed: all movement is entirely...

Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 05, 2014 0 comments

One of the hottest categories these days are so-called “tough” cameras. They’re able to handle the elements on hikes and climbs made by hardy souls, are ideal for divers who want to record the wonders of the (fairly) deep, and are excellent choices for less arduous adventures, like a sunset stroll on a wind-blown Caribbean beach where a more delicate and expensive DSLR might be at risk. All can handle the rough and tumble of life where no mobile phone dares tread.

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Surprisingly, one or two companies I'd seen at PMA the previous year were noticeably absent this time around, but in their stead were several distributors and manufacturers displaying new studio products. Mobility stood at the forefront in some booths, economical studio flash alternatives in the form of the ever popular but more modestly priced (e.g., amateur friendly)...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 02, 2012 Published: Jan 01, 2012 0 comments
Just as interchangeable lenses on an SLR each have a specific purpose or meet a certain need, the same applies to tripod heads. Even if a head comes as part of the tripod kit, you soon realize you may need to replace or supplement it. In this buyer’s guide to tripod heads we’ll look at some of the factors to consider, including budget, load considerations, applications, and matching heads to “sticks.” We’ll also look at the various types of heads available and how each can be used for very specific shooting needs.
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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 10, 2014 1 comments
Whether you find yourself in the wilderness, on a tropical beach, in a river, alongside a pounding waterfall, or on the Arctic tundra, shooting wildlife, scenic views, or the night sky, your tripod must be suited to the task. The practical choices come down to metal/aluminum alloy, composite/carbon fiber, or wood. (Composite materials also include basalt, but we’ll focus on the more popular and widely available carbon fiber in this category.)
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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

Perhaps the most exciting news in tripods is the first four-legged support. Yes, you read that correctly. In theory, it’s a more stable approach—just think of the pyramids. Aside from this innovation, there is a growing trend toward lighter-weight metals in tripods big and small—and that is certainly welcome. While carbon fiber, as a lightweight material, still has the advantage...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Oct 01, 2002 0 comments

Any time of year presents us with budding opportunities to shoot close-ups. We can find flowers any time of year, indoors--and possibly even outside. And we're not just limited to...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

Camera metering systems are great. No doubt about it. But there are times when you might want to expand your metering options, such as for flash or strobe studio and outdoor photography, for really tricky light and when you want to make a number of measurements within a scene, that a handheld meter will come in, well, handy.

Metering Opations: Reflected Light Readings

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