Barry Tanenbaum

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 18, 2012 0 comments
All the elements were right for Robert Beck to try something different. Shooting for Sports Illustrated at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Robert’s coverage included both the qualifying and medal rounds of the men’s aerials event in freestyle skiing, so there was plenty of opportunity for him to capture not only the razor-sharp peak-action images that typify SI coverage, but also to modify his technique to take a shot or two at turning prose into poetry.

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Aug 19, 2014 0 comments

Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia, is a favorite place for photography for Cindy Dyer, who specializes in botanical subjects, and it was there that two years ago she was featured in an exhibition of 88 of her photos. A visitor to that exhibit, who happened to be the wife of an art director for the U.S. Postal Service, saw her work and mentioned Cindy to her husband, who happened to be looking for specific subject images to license for stamps. Cindy submitted 20 photographs of ferns, from which the Postal Service selected five for First Class Forever Stamps, which are currently available for purchase online at the USPS website.

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

The first Dallas Cowboys Ron St. Angelo photographed were the Dallas Cowboys' cheerleaders. It was a good start. Studio shots of the cheerleaders led to photographing the players, then the games. Today his business card reads, "Official photographer of the Dallas Cowboys." Ron's been with the team from the late 1970s, from Landry and Staubach, through...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

If you've glanced at the photos and you're not laughing, you might think about skipping ahead to the next story. On these pages we're going to spend some time in the bemusement park that's the mind of Chip Simons, and if the weird light he's shining into the darkness didn't bring at least a smile, you're probably not going to enjoy the...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 23, 2014 0 comments

(In March 1986, the Least Bell’s Vireo, a bird species that Moose Peterson had volunteered to photograph, was listed as endangered, and Moose, who was just starting out as a photographer, was about to learn the power of a single image.)

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 2003 0 comments

Words matter.

Of course a writer's going to say that, but most photographers will agree that while the image carries the message, the words that accompany it can illuminate and interpret, and often increase the impact of the photograph. But...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 1999 1 comments

"I used to consider myself a surgeon, a medical inventor, and a photographer, in that order," Dr. Elliot Kornberg says. "Now I consider myself an inventor, a photographer, and a surgeon. Ultimately I want to be a photographer-inventor-surgeon."...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 25, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 31 comments
The intriguing thing about lightpainting is you never know exactly what you’re going to get. And whatever you get, you won’t get it again. That’s part of the technique’s appeal: you’re creating a one-of-a-kind photograph.

Simply, a lightpainting photo is an image made with a handheld, constant light source in a dark room or environment. The camera’s sensor captures only what you choose to illuminate. Lightpainting images can range from relatively simple to fairly complicated. Striking photos can be created indoors with nothing more than a still life subject, a tabletop to put it on, and a small LED penlight to light it. Or you can think big: how about a mega-powerful spotlight illuminating prairie land in the Grand Tetons or a mesa in Monument Valley?

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 1999 0 comments

James Balog's "Animals"
features a diverse range of photographs, from medium format portraits
to abstract images captured with a Holga camera.

James...

Filed under
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

The assignment from Endless Vacation magazine was to photograph the Gullah and Geechee people of the sea islands off Georgia and South Carolina. "The magazine was interested in portraying a people who live and work in much the same way as their...

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading