Barry Tanenbaum

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 09, 2014 0 comments
Mark Alberhasky, for one. Put him in a great situation where he can take very cool photographs and he’ll nail them nine times out of 10. Chances are, though, that won’t be enough. Just because the photos he’s making look good doesn’t mean he won’t be thinking about what he can do to create even better ones. You can attribute that drive to several factors, one of which is his early realization that if he took a straightforward photo of what everyone else was seeing, no matter how good a photo it was, it would be just that: what everyone else was seeing. The goal was to come up with his own ideas and add them to the creative process, and many of Mark’s photos are the result of taking that e
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Aug 19, 2014 0 comments

Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia, is a favorite place for photography for Cindy Dyer, who specializes in botanical subjects, and it was there that two years ago she was featured in an exhibition of 88 of her photos. A visitor to that exhibit, who happened to be the wife of an art director for the U.S. Postal Service, saw her work and mentioned Cindy to her husband, who happened to be looking for specific subject images to license for stamps. Cindy submitted 20 photographs of ferns, from which the Postal Service selected five for First Class Forever Stamps, which are currently available for purchase online at the USPS website.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 29, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments

Natural History
When Steve Gottlieb took this picture in 1985 he’d been practicing law for 10 years. Photography was his hobby, and his hometown, Washington, D.C., was his favorite subject.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 29, 2014 Published: May 01, 2014 0 comments
When Nathan Crowder shows his work at the Tennessee Art League’s monthly gallery show in downtown Nashville, he favors the maximum effect of displaying a few large images rather than, say, ten 8x10s. Not too long ago, this photo got an especially strong, emotional, and gratifying reaction.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 10, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
He didn’t set out to capture an icon in an image that’s instantly classic, but that’s pretty much what happened. “It was a walkabout on a foggy day,” Chris Ford says. “I sometimes like to shoot on foggy days in Manhattan, and I live on the Lower East Side, so getting down to the Brooklyn Bridge was relatively easy.”
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 05, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
The camera Michael carries might be his Leica M6, loaded with either Ilford XP-2 or Kodak BW400CN chromogenic film and fitted with either a 35mm f/2 or 50mm f/2 Summicron lens; or his Fuji X10 point-and-shoot with its zoom lens set for the equivalent of 50mm; or his Nikon D200 or D700 with the manual 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens he got with his F3 back when he was in college.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 29, 2014 Published: Mar 01, 2014 0 comments
“I got to Los Angeles four days before the ’84 Olympic games began, and at the gymnastics pavilion saw Glenn Sundby, the founder and publisher of International Gymnast magazine. I knew Glenn, and he’d been hired as venue chief for photographers. Not knowing he’d get that job, two years earlier he’d bought an arena ticket and had a front row center seat for the events. He gave me that ticket in return for use in his magazine of any photographs USA Gymnastics didn’t choose.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 14, 2014 Published: Jan 01, 2014 0 comments
Currently a lecturer, teacher, and writer, Sam Abell’s celebrated career includes positions as a contract and staff photographer and photographer-in-residence at National Geographic magazine. This 1959 photo of his father at the Painesville, Ohio, train station is the homepage image of his website, samabell-thephotographiclife.com.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 06, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
Chances are you won’t be photographing in the negative numbers of extreme cold that Layne Kennedy often encounters—we’re talking -15 to -30 degrees Fahrenheit—but his experience with and guidelines for cold-weather shooting can provide you with a considerable degree of comfort no matter what the temperature.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Dec 17, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 0 comments
Rick Sammon’s first comment when I asked about this picture was, “The best time to take a night picture is not at night.” Twilight is a better choice, and that’s when this image was made in Albuquerque, New Mexico, which was the first stop for Rick and his wife, Susan, on their six-day tour last April of selected attractions along Route 66.

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