Barry Tanenbaum

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Here are a few things AJ Neste's learned about photographing surfers:
One, it's the singer, not the song. "The most important part of being successful at this," he says, "is knowing the surfer. It's not just showing up somewhere and taking photos of random surfers. You won't know their personal style."

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 28, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 2 comments
A phone call from a friend woke Chris Fulcher at his home in Newtown, Connecticut, around 10:30am on December 14th last year. “I’d slept late and didn’t know what was going on,” Chris says. “My buddy told me to check the news, and then I rushed to the school because my 6-year-old cousin goes to that school.”
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 23, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 25 comments
In 1987, my friends Julie and Jim bought the 12-room, three-story Victorian in which they’ve raised their daughters, Megan and Emily. Early on they researched the house and the Connecticut mill town in which it’s located. They found maps that indicated the house had been built between 1870 and 1875; town records revealed much of the chronology of ownership. Over the years they renovated the kitchen and one of the bathrooms, stripped layers of paint from woodwork and doors, replaced wallpaper and made restorations and repairs. They came to realize that the original floor plan of the house was pretty much intact, though there seemed to be some changes they couldn’t quite figure out. And Julie, Jim, Megan, and Emily—they like to figure things out. Often they thought, if only there were photographs of the old house.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Barbara Kinney, All Rights Reserved

The think about the road less traveled is that it makes for a quicker commute. Barbara Kinney drives Seattle's Route 99 from her home to her job--she's a picture editor at The Seattle Times--and finds it a better way to go than the Interstate, which replaced 99 as the area's main highway.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 28, 2012 Published: Feb 01, 2012 0 comments
That picture always held a fascination,” Michael Crouser says of an image he took in Paris in 1986. “It was just after college, and I hadn’t come to the point of understanding what my own aesthetic tastes were, but in that picture there was a hint of things to come…a bit of foreshadowing of the things I would go on to do.”
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 01, 2011 1 comments

Here’s the thing: the dogs aren’t fighting; they’re playing.

When they run, jump, growl, and tussle in canine versions of tag, wrestling, and catch me if you can, it often looks like fighting. It can make people uneasy.

Michael Crouser took these photographs, which have been selected from his book, Dog Run, over a two-year...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

The fact that Lizz Rosenbaum invariably carries a camera is not surprising. She was raised in a family where photography hit the trifecta: business, pleasure, and passion.

But what's with the mirror?

Well, the mirror makes it possible for Lizz's photography to be entirely self-sufficient. With a setting or...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 29, 2011 Published: Jun 01, 2011 2 comments
Years ago Dale Huncovsky, owner of the only grocery in Cuba, Kansas, had a heart bypass operation. Since then several men from town show up once a week at Dale’s store to unload the semi that brings the week’s supply of groceries. That’s how the personal and the practical play out in Cuba.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 21, 2012 Published: Oct 01, 2012 1 comments
Who: Robert Beck, staff photographer for Sports Illustrated.
What: Infrared (IR) photography.
When: “The editors give me some leeway,” Robert says, “but I’m not going to be using it for a decisive putt.”
Where: Golf courses all over the world.
Why: Although the job calls for capture of the peak moment, the turning point, the key play, the tense concentration, the moment when the athlete’s body language gives it all away, there’s always the professional and personal challenge to do something different.
How: With a Nikon D700 modified for infrared photography.
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2004 0 comments

Lin Alder changed his mind. And his style, too.

"I came to photography initially as a black and white large format landscape photographer," Lin says. "Ansel Adams was my primary inspiration, as he was for a lot of...

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