Barry Tanenbaum

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 26, 2013 Published: Jun 01, 2013 2 comments
There are stories we tell to explain ourselves, to clarify who we are, and to account for why we are who we are. And no matter what the apparent subject of these stories, what they are always really about is the past. “The past is never dead,” William Faulkner said. “It’s not even past.”
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Lori Stoll, All Rights Reserved

Got something you've always wanted to do, something that's long intrigued and attracted you, but you were way too busy with your career to go after? If you're lucky, one day you'll find the career's going along okay and you've got the time to chase down a dream or two.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 1998 1 comments

The thing is, we don't
always look our best. And even when we do, the face in the mirror is
not the face we're going to see in the photograph; neither is
the rest of the body. We tend to automatically editou...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, Gil Lopez-Espina, All Rights Reserved

No matter how far we get from the starting point, there's always something that calls us back. Early influences, first goals, original career choices--they all have a way of hanging around at the edges, only to show up strong somewhere down the line.

That happened recently...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 01, 2010 0 comments

Eventually the upper basin states of Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming, to hold back water from the lower basin states of Nevada, Arizona, and California, began in 1956 to build the Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

Judah S. Harris tells this story about one of his photos: "I had just bought a new Bogen tripod, and I went out in the Olympic National Forest area in Washington to photograph with it. I left my rented car down on the road. I wanted to photograph...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 1999 0 comments

About a year ago I was talking to commercial and industrial photographer Lou Jones about the "personality" of a photograph, and how the photographer's point of view is absolutely necessary in order to make images that are more than merely record...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Here are a few things AJ Neste's learned about photographing surfers:
One, it's the singer, not the song. "The most important part of being successful at this," he says, "is knowing the surfer. It's not just showing up somewhere and taking photos of random surfers. You won't know their personal style."

...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 28, 2013 Published: Apr 01, 2013 2 comments
A phone call from a friend woke Chris Fulcher at his home in Newtown, Connecticut, around 10:30am on December 14th last year. “I’d slept late and didn’t know what was going on,” Chris says. “My buddy told me to check the news, and then I rushed to the school because my 6-year-old cousin goes to that school.”
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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 23, 2012 Published: Apr 01, 2012 27 comments
In 1987, my friends Julie and Jim bought the 12-room, three-story Victorian in which they’ve raised their daughters, Megan and Emily. Early on they researched the house and the Connecticut mill town in which it’s located. They found maps that indicated the house had been built between 1870 and 1875; town records revealed much of the chronology of ownership. Over the years they renovated the kitchen and one of the bathrooms, stripped layers of paint from woodwork and doors, replaced wallpaper and made restorations and repairs. They came to realize that the original floor plan of the house was pretty much intact, though there seemed to be some changes they couldn’t quite figure out. And Julie, Jim, Megan, and Emily—they like to figure things out. Often they thought, if only there were photographs of the old house.

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