Barry Tanenbaum

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 23, 2014 0 comments

(In March 1986, the Least Bell’s Vireo, a bird species that Moose Peterson had volunteered to photograph, was listed as endangered, and Moose, who was just starting out as a photographer, was about to learn the power of a single image.)

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jan 02, 2015 0 comments

It’s welcome news to any photographer when the look of their images becomes a distinct, signature style. That’s exactly what has happened to Benny Migliorino, whose specialty is environmental and location portraits. “A lot of people say that what I’ve become known for is dramatic lighting,” Migliorino acknowledges, “but I didn’t set out to be known for that—it’s just the way I like to light, and the way I want my photographs to look.”

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 2003 0 comments

Words matter.

Of course a writer's going to say that, but most photographers will agree that while the image carries the message, the words that accompany it can illuminate and interpret, and often increase the impact of the photograph. But...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 1999 1 comments

"I used to consider myself a surgeon, a medical inventor, and a photographer, in that order," Dr. Elliot Kornberg says. "Now I consider myself an inventor, a photographer, and a surgeon. Ultimately I want to be a photographer-inventor-surgeon."...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jul 25, 2012 Published: Jun 01, 2012 24 comments
The intriguing thing about lightpainting is you never know exactly what you’re going to get. And whatever you get, you won’t get it again. That’s part of the technique’s appeal: you’re creating a one-of-a-kind photograph.

Simply, a lightpainting photo is an image made with a handheld, constant light source in a dark room or environment. The camera’s sensor captures only what you choose to illuminate. Lightpainting images can range from relatively simple to fairly complicated. Striking photos can be created indoors with nothing more than a still life subject, a tabletop to put it on, and a small LED penlight to light it. Or you can think big: how about a mega-powerful spotlight illuminating prairie land in the Grand Tetons or a mesa in Monument Valley?

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 1999 0 comments

James Balog's "Animals"
features a diverse range of photographs, from medium format portraits
to abstract images captured with a Holga camera.

James...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 01, 2003 0 comments

The assignment from Endless Vacation magazine was to photograph the Gullah and Geechee people of the sea islands off Georgia and South Carolina. "The magazine was interested in portraying a people who live and work in much the same way as their...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 13, 2005 Published: Jul 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, David Middleton, All Rights Reserved

"The intoxication of exotica is overrated," David Middleton says. So if you're thinking of traveling far and wide in search of great outdoor and nature photographs, save your money and your time--at least until you've explored the familiar: your own backyard.

"It's...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 26, 2015 0 comments

As he neared the end of the process of making prints for an exhibition of his large- and medium-format photography, Geoffrey Roberts was ready to spread the word about the upcoming event. “I was in the darkroom once or twice a week for eight or nine months leading up to the show,” he says, “and to promote it I took pictures in the darkroom and posted them to Flickr, Facebook, Instagram—basically everywhere.”

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

After a while, showing wasn’t enough. Telling became the point.

And because Chris Heisey knows his Civil War, he has a lot to tell in his photographs.

Chris has been photographing Civil War battlefields for almost 20 years, and at the start he took straightforward record shots. “I’m self-taught,” he says, “and...

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