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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 01, 1999 0 comments

When a writer friend heard
that photographer Les Jörgensen takes landscape and location photographs
using a high-resolution digital back on a view camera, and goes into
the field with a computer, batteries, battery...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 17, 2016 0 comments

Bill Hatcher was near the park entrance when a wildfire forced the closing of Tioga Pass road into Yosemite National Park last summer. “The fire was threatening to cross the road into Yosemite,” he says, “and helicopters and tankers were being sent out on kind of a bombing run to cut the fire off.”

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 31, 2015 0 comments

Unlike landscape, portrait, wildlife, or even sports photographers, the first shots taken these days by advertising photographers on the job are almost always instantly seen and judged—by the client, the client’s representative, an agency rep, or an art director. Pressure, anyone?

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Oct 18, 2012 0 comments
All the elements were right for Robert Beck to try something different. Shooting for Sports Illustrated at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Robert’s coverage included both the qualifying and medal rounds of the men’s aerials event in freestyle skiing, so there was plenty of opportunity for him to capture not only the razor-sharp peak-action images that typify SI coverage, but also to modify his technique to take a shot or two at turning prose into poetry.

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 27, 2015 0 comments
Here’s the one thing you can count on in sports photography: the pictures won’t be there waiting for you. Images of key moments, athletes’ efforts, and fans’ reactions—you’re going to have to be at the top of your game to get them.
Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Aug 19, 2014 0 comments

Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia, is a favorite place for photography for Cindy Dyer, who specializes in botanical subjects, and it was there that two years ago she was featured in an exhibition of 88 of her photos. A visitor to that exhibit, who happened to be the wife of an art director for the U.S. Postal Service, saw her work and mentioned Cindy to her husband, who happened to be looking for specific subject images to license for stamps. Cindy submitted 20 photographs of ferns, from which the Postal Service selected five for First Class Forever Stamps, which are currently available for purchase online at the USPS website.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

The first Dallas Cowboys Ron St. Angelo photographed were the Dallas Cowboys' cheerleaders. It was a good start. Studio shots of the cheerleaders led to photographing the players, then the games. Today his business card reads, "Official photographer of the Dallas Cowboys." Ron's been with the team from the late 1970s, from Landry and Staubach, through...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 18, 2015 0 comments

[Column Note: Most people come to professional photography by traveling a familiar route: from an early fascination with cameras, to photo classes and courses, followed by assisting a pro to gain some real-world experience. Then comes striking out on one's own as photographer, which, if all goes well, is followed by the frequent printing of invoices. Others, however, arrive at a pro career sideways—that is, coming at it from another occupation. The stories these "second career" pro photographers tell tend to be quite interesting, even inspirational. And those stories are what this new online column, titled Going Pro, is all about.]

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 25, 2016 0 comments

Gabe Rogel gets a kick out of viewers’ reactions to his photographs. “It’s fun,” he says, “to watch people look at the pictures and realize, Oh, you had to be there, too!”

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 08, 2015 0 comments

It’s not your typical image of that place then, which means Mirjam Evers has done her job well. She has images of the colorful chaos of revelers in full regalia, but the challenge is to get something special. “The travel publications I work for ask for something different and unusual,” Evers says. “She was posing, and most of the photographers were shooting from eye level, so I crouched down.”

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