George Schaub
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George Schaub Mar 01, 2001 0 comments

When they first arrived on the scene digital SLRs were well beyond the means of all but the well heeled. News organizations, sports photojournalists, government photographers, and the corporate world were the first to take advantage of the new tech...

Newsletter
George Schaub Mar 27, 2007 0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

35mm Cameras, Test Reports
George Schaub Aug 01, 2001 Published: Aug 01, 2000 0 comments

Professional photographers need a snapshot camera, too. But they require one that delivers the sharpness they have come to expect in their working cameras and a quality look and feel. Happily, there is a small, and somewhat pricey class...

News
George Schaub Feb 01, 2005 0 comments

If you've ever been walking down the street and a picture caught your
eye, but had no camera to capture the moment, then the small, shirt-pocket size
digicams might just be item you're seeking. A number of companies, including
Pentax, Casio and Minolta have already introduced such models, each with their
own unique feature sets. Now, Contax, a name renowned for exquisite cameras
and excellent lenses, has jumped into the fray with their own version, the U4R,
a 4-megapixel camera sporting a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* lens. Those familiar
with the amazing image clarity of this line of lenses will immediately recognize
the name; those unfamiliar with it can be assured that it is a legendary name
in optics. The camera has just under a 3x optical zoom lens, delivering the
equivalent of 38-115mm in 35mm format. There's also a digital zoom if
you need it, delivering over 400mm, but as with many digital zooms it's
really a crop into the frame, and will not deliver the quality of the prime
optics.

...

Editor's Notes
George Schaub Aug 01, 2005 0 comments

Judging from the letters we receive and the action on our Forums (at www.shutterbug.com) the debate between digital and film photographers is ongoing, and shows no signs of abating. Some photographers have manned the silver-halide barricades and defy all comers by waving the silver-halide flag, while others scoff at the film fans by terming them reactionaries and...

Editor's Notes
George Schaub Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

I recently got back a roll of processed color negative film from a lab touting itself as “professional” and it reminded me why it’s difficult for me to go back to shooting film. It’s not that I don’t like the look of film, or that I don’t enjoy actually working with it; it’s that the prints were well below my expectations. I checked the negatives and they...

Lighting Equipment
George Schaub May 01, 2007 0 comments

Today's digital photographers have more ways to control color than you can shake a stick at, with programmed White Balance (WB) options, custom color temperature bracketing, and even color maps through which you can toggle to attain any color bias you want, and that's just in the camera. It's almost as if all the designers thought everyone needed a color...

Editor's Notes
George Schaub Jan 01, 2008 0 comments

As someone who has paid the rent with photography since high school I often find myself uncomfortable when the words "photography" and "art" are linked in a sentence, especially when art is spelled with a capital "A." I see photography as a craft, one that takes rigor, training, and sacrifice to get right. But I also see photography as an art;...

Editor's Notes
George Schaub Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

The portrait is one of the most demanding of all photographic tasks. We are asked to capture the character of a person in the brief, fleeting moment it takes to make an exposure. Painters seem to have the advantage, being able to take hours or days to render their impressions. They can block out forms and fill in the light and shadow as they see fit. What do we have to contend...