George Schaub

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

While I am very proud of the job we do here at Shutterbug magazine, there's another aspect of our work that I'd like to call to your attention--our website at www.shutterbug.com. I was reminded of what we offer when I recently met a Shutterbug reader at a photo show. After we talked for a bit about the state...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments

If you go way back you remember the first telephoto zoom lenses as heavy, ungainly things that were often more trouble than they were worth. Travel a bit ahead in time and check out the wide-to-tele zooms, and you get the same thing, with...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 17, 2013 Published: Nov 01, 2013 1 comments
The 70-200mm focal length has been the standard tele-zoom choice for many years, offering near normal to a good tele range that suits many practical purposes. Yet, quite a few stock-in-trade 70-200mm lenses had been slow or lost significant aperture as soon as you left the shortest zoom setting, making them a real challenge for handheld, low-light, or even max focal length shooting. Certainly, improvements in sensors and processors in terms of the high ISO/image quality ratio have helped. If you’re too slow on shutter speed with a variable aperture zoom you can always jack up the sensitivity. But that’s not always a great choice and it seems to force you to compromise image quality just to make up for the lens losing “speed” just when you need it most.
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Apr 06, 2009 6 comments

There was time when those seeking super-wide lenses for APS-C size sensor cameras didn’t have much choice, but new light gathering systems that distribute light evenly from lens to sensor, as well as new optical formulas from camera makers and independent lens manufacturers, have changed that point of view. The latest in this welcome new class of glass is from Tamron, with their 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 offering. Priced at around $500 (street) and weighing in at about 14 oz., the Tamron 10-24mm is useable for cameras that require “motor in the lens” operation, such as the Nikon D40X, on which this lens was tested.  The DiII designation tells you that this lens is for digital SLRs with APS-C sensors.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Sep 26, 2006 0 comments

One look at the specs of this new Tamron zoom and you'll understand why
it's immediately attractive to anyone carrying around a digital SLR in
their day bag. Weighing in at around 15 oz and measuring just under 3x3.2",
the lens is quite the marvel of size for what it delivers in focal length and
aperture options. Indeed, if someone told me that a constant aperture, 17mm
wide lens would be this size a few years back I'd have thought they had
lost their optical marbles. To be fair, however, that 17mm is not really a 17mm
in 35mm equivalent, thus practical terms, and I wonder why lenses like this
are still labeled that way. This lens is only for APS-C sensors, which means
it has the "35mm equivalent" of a 27mm wide angle view and 80mm
tele.


Tamron's new 17-50mm zoom, available in Canon, Nikon, Konica
Minolta (read Sony), and Pentax (read Samsung) mounts is highly
portable and compact.

...

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: May 08, 2007 0 comments

The versatility of the Tamron 18-250mm lens is evident in both close
focusing and when gathering in distant subjects. The crisp edges...
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

Long considered the focal-length sweet spot for macro work, the 60mm focal length of the new Tamron 60mm f/2 lens ($569 MSRP) converts out to 96mm for Canon and 90mm for Nikon APS-C D-SLRs.

Filed under
George Schaub Posted: May 13, 2014 Published: Apr 01, 2014 0 comments
To say that photography is technologically driven these days is an understatement. While the miracle of being able to capture an image in and of itself is still a source of amazement to me, photography has changed so radically as of late that you need a scorecard to keep up with the game. That’s the intent of this issue, to bring you up to speed on the many developments that sit under the hood in capture, storage, and image delivery.
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Jun 29, 2014 Published: Jun 01, 2014 0 comments
This issue contains a mix of articles, including an interesting photo project, a show review of images by Garry Winogrand, and a look at the trends and opportunities of lifestyle photography, but we’ve also included numerous tests on cameras and gear that show the way toward where image capture and lighting is headed. I feel that kind of mix is a blend of the technical and the aesthetic that helps define where we are in terms of technical advancement and what Shutterbug as a magazine offers and represents. Of course, I realize that equipment is not what a great photo makes, but taking advantage of and understanding the tools at our disposal allows us to explore new avenues of our creativity.
Filed under
George Schaub Posted: Sep 30, 2014 0 comments
What happens when you get editors from 28 photo and imaging magazines from 15 countries into one room and ask them to pick the top products of 2014? As you can imagine there might be some, if you will, amiable contention, particularly in a year when so many amazing products were introduced and the advances in technology were so impressive.

Pages

X
Enter your Shutterbug username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.
Loading