George Schaub

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 12, 2013 Published: Jul 01, 2013 1 comments
There’s something about a fixed focal length lens that brings the photographer out in me. It forces me to move in and back from compositions without resorting to a zoom. Yes, there are times when a zoom is most appreciated—especially the fast constant aperture zooms now available—but a prime puts me in a mindset that a zoom has yet to match.
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George Schaub Posted: Mar 26, 2008 0 comments

If you ever want a unique point of view try a "fisheye" lens. Like
looking through a door peephole (which in fact is a "fisheye" type)
this order of lens sacrifices linear correction in favor of a very wide angle
of view. Originally made for creating "full sky" images when pointed
straight up, they had long ago been adopted by photographers for creation of
decidedly different points of view, and, today, even doing QuickTime movies
to display the interior of a condo or vacation home.


Sigma 4.5mm f/2.8 EX DC HSM (Motor-in) Lenses

...

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George Schaub Posted: Jul 24, 2008 Published: Jul 30, 2008 0 comments

The Sigma APO 150-50mm lens is a moderately fast, super-telephoto zoom designed to work with both APS-C and full-frame DSLR cameras. It offers quite useful close focusing (7.2 ft) and two modes of what they deem "optical stabilization" (OS.) Weighing in at 67.4 oz you always know its there, but then again this is one impressive piece of...

George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2008 2 comments

A funny thing happened to me while I was shooting and reviewing the new Sigma DP1 compact camera in New Mexico. I had taken a lunch break in a local taqueria and in came a couple that sat down at the next table. Next to the guy's backpack and hat he set down the Sigma DP1. I did a double take, and asked him how he liked it. "Great," he said, "the picture...

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2003 0 comments

Sigma SD9

The long-awaited Sigma SD9 Digital SLR arrived in our offices and although we had a brief hands-on shoot with it during photokina last September this was our first opportunity to put it through its paces. First off, the...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2009 0 comments

There is an underlying desire in every travel or street photographer to be able to carry one lens to cover all contingencies.

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George Schaub Posted: Mar 01, 2005 1 comments

Note the "EX DG" appellation in this new Sigma lens. This signifies a lens that you can use for both film and digital photography, as opposed to Sigma's "EX DC" branding, which can only be used with digital SLRs. The difference is in the image circle each projects. Use a "DC" lens on a film camera and you'll have serious...

George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Buffs of infrared photography often go to great lengths to get the ethereal effects that define their images. Now that Kodak has served notice that their high-speed black and white IR film is on the endangered species list, there will be IR film shooters everywhere looking for a way to continue their exploration of that fascinating world. In the past year we have reviewed two Fuji...

George Schaub Posted: Mar 22, 2005 Published: Apr 01, 2005 0 comments

Photos © 2004, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

If you enjoy exploring the fascinating world of close-up photography you should consider a ring flash as an essential part of your creative kit. A ring flash mounts around your taking lens and eliminates problems associated with standard shoe-mount flash and even off-camera flash, mainly the inability to down-angle the...

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George Schaub Posted: Aug 01, 2008 0 comments

If you ever want a unique point of view try a "fisheye" lens. Like looking through a door peephole (which in fact is a "fisheye" type) this order of lens sacrifices linear correction in favor of a very wide angle of view. Originally made for creating "full sky" images when pointed straight up, they had long ago been adopted by photographers for...

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