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Posted: Nov 24, 2009 0 comments

Dynamic Range

by George Schaub

Dynamic range is the ability of the sensor to capture a certain range of light and dark, or brightness values. Think of it as the number of keys on the piano the “hand” of the sensor can cover. While the sensor may offer an octave’s worth of tones, this octave can be moved all around thekeyboard.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

One of the main problem areas for many digital photographers is getting a print
that is reasonably close to what you see on screen. Assuming that you have a
calibrated display (and if you don't, stop reading this article and profile
your monitor!) the problem may lie in your printer settings. It's all
too common to find that someone having problems is actually managing the printer
settings twice - once in the print driver and once in their image editing software.

...

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George Schaub Posted: May 31, 2011 0 comments

Imagine yourself walking into a room where there are numerous objects covered with small mirrors. The mirrors follow the form and shape of the objects. The walls of the room have a slot that goes continuously around the entire room. Behind the slot is a light that shines into the room and that travels the entire distance, from wall to wall. As the light travels it passes through numerous color filters built into the slot. The light reflects off the mirror facets on the objects. You can also move throughout the room and observe the objects and the light by standing with the light coming in over your shoulder, from the side or even standing behind the objects as the light hits them.

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 24, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Here's at...

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Posted: Aug 26, 2008 0 comments

Industry Perspective

New "Four Thirds" System On the Way

by Ron Leach

The 2008 Photokina World of Imaging exposition is rapidly approaching, and
we can expect some interesting technological developments between now and when
the event opens in Cologne, Germany on September 23. One suchanno...

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Posted: Mar 30, 2010 0 comments

April 2010

On The Cover
This month our focus is on the art and craft of wedding photography, as we explore some intriguing aspects of that challenging business. In addition, we look into the business of assisting and have brought you insider tips from the best and brightest photo assistants working in the field today. Finally, we haveTes...

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Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Feb 28, 2006 0 comments


Doorways are among the most common framing devices. Here, both
color and shape help frame the twocowg...

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Posted: Jul 31, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © 2007, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Here's aclo...

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Posted: Dec 30, 2008 0 comments

January 2009

On the Cover
This month we’re taking you directly to the show floor of photokina, the world’s largest photo and imaging show held in Cologne, Germany, every two years. As you’ll uncover while reading our reports, there is a lot of innovation coming your way in 2009. For starters, expect to hear more aboutthe...

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Posted: Jul 27, 2010 0 comments

Lens Effects

Light And Lenses, Plus A Unique Point Of View

by Jim Zuckerman

Lenses don’t interpret the world as our eyes do. The way light interacts with glass and with the metal blades of a lens aperture is different than how it interacts with our eyes, and it’s noteworthy to mention some of the effects thatc...

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Ron Leach Posted: May 30, 2006 0 comments

Better Photos, More Sleep, Less Fungus



By Ron Leach, Publisher

I recently stumbled on a rather strange website dedicated to a description
of "bizarre May holidays." And there was National Photo Month, sandwiched
in between Better Sleep Month, National Good Car Care Month, National Barbecue
Month and National SaladMonth.

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Posted: Sep 25, 2007 0 comments

Malibu photo and painting in Corel Painter by Karen Sperling

Teaching theArt...

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Posted: Apr 28, 2009 0 comments

Exposure Diagnostics

The “Blinkies”

by George Schaub

When scene contrast is high there may be a danger of overexposure, particularly when you do not take care to read the highlight values to keep them well within the dynamic range capability of the sensor. When overexposure is extreme you lose detail in thesub...

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Howard Millard Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:




You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

1.
I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)

...

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Posted: Oct 26, 2010 0 comments

Think Negative

The Positive Power Of The Inverse Command

by Howard Millard

Since we were toddlers, we’ve all been told to think positive. I guess that in most situations that will serve you well. But photographically, you may want to ignore that advice. If you’re not entirely pleased with your latest picture...

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