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Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 21, 2005 0 comments

One of the main problem areas for many digital photographers is getting a print
that is reasonably close to what you see on screen. Assuming that you have a
calibrated display (and if you don't, stop reading this article and profile
your monitor!) the problem may lie in your printer settings. It's all
too common to find that someone having problems is actually managing the printer
settings twice - once in the print driver and once in their image editing software.

...

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George Schaub Posted: Apr 24, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Here's at...

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Posted: Aug 26, 2008 0 comments

Industry Perspective

New "Four Thirds" System On the Way

by Ron Leach

The 2008 Photokina World of Imaging exposition is rapidly approaching, and
we can expect some interesting technological developments between now and when
the event opens in Cologne, Germany on September 23. One suchanno...

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Posted: Mar 30, 2010 0 comments

April 2010

On The Cover
This month our focus is on the art and craft of wedding photography, as we explore some intriguing aspects of that challenging business. In addition, we look into the business of assisting and have brought you insider tips from the best and brightest photo assistants working in the field today. Finally, we haveTes...

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Text and photography by Ron Leach Posted: Feb 28, 2006 0 comments


Doorways are among the most common framing devices. Here, both
color and shape help frame the twocowg...

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Posted: Jul 31, 2007 0 comments

All Photos © 2007, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Here's aclo...

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Posted: Dec 30, 2008 0 comments

January 2009

On the Cover
This month we’re taking you directly to the show floor of photokina, the world’s largest photo and imaging show held in Cologne, Germany, every two years. As you’ll uncover while reading our reports, there is a lot of innovation coming your way in 2009. For starters, expect to hear more aboutthe...

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Posted: Jul 27, 2010 0 comments

Lens Effects

Light And Lenses, Plus A Unique Point Of View

by Jim Zuckerman

Lenses don’t interpret the world as our eyes do. The way light interacts with glass and with the metal blades of a lens aperture is different than how it interacts with our eyes, and it’s noteworthy to mention some of the effects thatc...

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Howard Millard Posted: Jan 31, 2006 2 comments


The fast, streamlined Minolta DiMAGE Scan Elite 5400 scans...

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Posted: Sep 25, 2007 0 comments

John Paul Caponigro and Mac Holbert To Host



Encore "Fine Art of Digital Printing" Workshop




Epson America Inc. has announced that John Paul Caponigro and Mac Holbert, two
of the pre-eminent leaders in digital photography and fine art printing, are
joining forces to conduct the "Fine Art of DigitalPrinting"...

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Posted: Mar 31, 2009 0 comments

Exposure Tips

Outdoor Fill Flash/Exposure Compensation Combo

by George Schaub

When working outdoors think of your built-in flash or auxiliary speedlight as a secondary light source that can be used to supplement, but not overpower the essential light source, the sun. Use that secondary source as a way to highlightcertain...

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Posted: Oct 26, 2010 0 comments

Seeing Shadows

“Negative” Space That Defines Content

by George Schaub

While there may be times when you want to open shadows to see the details “inside,” deep texture and detail-less shadows play an important role in defining the space in a photograph. Such shadows can also take on a character orl...

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Howard Millard Posted: Oct 25, 2005 0 comments

Could your portraits be enhanced
by the mysterious, otherworldly glow of a black and white infrared (IR) effect?
In the past, pre-digital darkroom, the only way you could get the IR look was
shooting special IR film, quite a challenge to expose, process, and print correctly.
Working digitally you can avoid many of the pitfalls and gain much more control
in the bargain. Here's how to emulate that exotic infrared look digitally:




You can start with a scan of any color slide, print, or negative you've
shot with your film camera or, even easier, with a color file from your digital
camera. If you're starting with a print, negative, or slide, scan it in
RGB color mode. Once you've got the digital file, open it in Adobe Photoshop
CS (or some earlier versions) to follow the steps outlined here. You can also
achieve the effect with Adobe Elements 2 or other advanced image-editing programs,
but the names of some tools or dialog boxes may be slightly different. Always
work on a copy to preserve your original scan. In fact, with this technique,
it is a good idea to make two or three copies in order to try different settings
in search of the effect you like best. Just follow these steps and you'll
be on your way to easy IR.

1.
I began with this original color file shot in Raw mode with a
Canon Digital Rebel 6-megapixel digital SLR with a Canon 18-55mm
lens at 55mm (equivalent to a 90mm lens in 35mm format). File
size: 18MB. (Model: Riley Messina.)

...

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Posted: Aug 29, 2006 0 comments

Look at the Future


By Ron Leach, Publisher

A leading software company and a respected market research/consulting firm
recently shared their vision on upcoming technological developments, market
trends, and anticipated consumer behavior that will influence the future of
digital photography. Corel Corporation's software solutionsa...

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Posted: Dec 25, 2007 0 comments

The work space consists of two main windows, with variations on each available.
The main work space (goldenhour) gives you a configurable split screen that
quickly shows the before and after of each filter chosen. You can choose from
color or black and white filman...

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