Pro Techniques

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

It's challenging to get the right combination of true color, composition, and light playing on figures who are moving in unprecedented positions at a rapid rate of speed. The dancers are theatrical, sassy, and innovative, and this is where Boston photographer Jeffrey Dunn shines as he photographed America's Ballroom Challenge for Public Television's presentation...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Just when I thought I'd seen her at her best, Lois Greenfield steps it up a notch and amazes me once again with her sharp eye for the body in motion. "Sharp" is the operative word here. Many photographers, myself among them, may accept a little blur in a fast-moving subject. Not Greenfield. She learned long ago that if sharpness and crisp detail are important to...

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Phillip Andrews Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

For the last 30 years, Greg Gorman has spent his working life capturing great portrait images. To many, the very essence of his work centers around and draws strength from the celebration of fame, fortune, and position. It is true that his most recognizable images are the faces of the famous, but dig a little deeper and you will find that his imagery goes beyond the mere...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2007 0 comments

The fact that Lizz Rosenbaum invariably carries a camera is not surprising. She was raised in a family where photography hit the trifecta: business, pleasure, and passion.

But what's with the mirror?

Well, the mirror makes it possible for Lizz's photography to be entirely self-sufficient. With a setting or...

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Art Rosch Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

The earth rotates tilted on its axis approximately 23Þ. This fact renders most forms of astrophotography maddeningly complex. There is one form of night sky photography that is given to us in relative simplicity by our home planet's relentless spin: star trails. All we need to create gorgeous star trail shots is a camera, a tripod, and a remote or cable release.
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Peter K. Burian Posted: Oct 01, 2007 0 comments

Although some outdoor photographers prefer to shoot everything by available light, electronic flash can be surprisingly useful. In the past, it was difficult to produce a natural looking effect with flash in outdoor photography without a bit of expertise. All too often the results appeared to be artificial, with a harsh effect caused by flash becoming the primary light source.

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Lorraine A. DarConte Posted: Oct 01, 2007 1 comments

If life is a series of experiences, then travel/documentary photographer Robert Leon is indeed living a very full and interesting one. As a young boy, Leon was mesmerized by the world depicted in his parents' National Geographic and LIFE magazines. "I would dream of going to these places and was fascinated by the different cultures," he says. Eventually, after...

Steve Bedell Posted: Sep 01, 2007 2 comments

Digital has created a tremendous amount of change in the last few years, and photographers who have not been quick to adapt have lost business and, perhaps more importantly, business opportunities. The landscape has changed dramatically, and the people doing professional photography range from MWACs (Moms With A Camera) who work for practically nothing or for friends to very...

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Phillip Andrews Posted: Sep 01, 2007 0 comments

There is no doubt that a well-crafted lith print is, to borrow an oft-used phrase from my father-in-law, "a thing of beauty is (therefore) a joy forever." The trick, for the experienced and occasional darkroom users alike, is the production of such a print. I have always had difficulty getting consistency with the production of my prints. Despite this frustration, my...

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Sep 01, 2007 6 comments

An educator since the early 1960s, Jerry Uelsmann began assembling his photographs from multiple negatives decades before digital tools like Photoshop were available. Using as many as seven enlargers to expose a single print, his darkroom skills allowed him to create evocative images that combined the realism of photography and the fluidity of our dreams.

...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

It's probably no surprise to most of you, but in today's digital world, having a website is almost a requirement if you're to be considered a pro or more than a casual snapshooter. Many publications and image purchasers don't want to deal with looking at contact sheets or browsing at images on a CD or DVD--aside from the task of inserting and reading...

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Last year I wrote about one of my favorite software programs, Panorama Maker 3. The folks at ArcSoft have unveiled an updated Version 4 ($39.99 new, $24.99 upgrade), so I thought I'd give it a try.

Version 4 is more intuitive than Version 3, and that's really saying something. The first couple of panoramas I tried went together easily, but I noticed that...

Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Consistently achieving accurate color may be digital photography's most difficult skill to master. Shooting the same subject under different lighting conditions can cause unacceptable color variations which can be difficult and time consuming to correct later. Digital cameras have many more color balance options than film ever did, but when the ambient lighting changes from...

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Steve Gottlieb Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

In the last several years, the digital revolution has completely changed how photo books and albums are created...and change has been for the better in every respect. It's out with the old--covers without images, prints painstakingly glued in or slipped into boring 4x6" sleeves, improvised captioning (often by hand), heavy pages (often with unappealing acetate...

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Scott Stulberg Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Mirroring photos has always been one of my favorite techniques, and it is a relatively easy way to come up with some fun and creative images. Mirroring images consists of duplicating part of a photograph and flipping it around in different ways to create a mirrored effect. I use all kinds of subjects for these creations and I am constantly looking for things that would produce...

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