Pro Techniques

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Jon Canfield Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

If you maintain all your own images you have more freedom in how to go about tagging these photos for future reference.

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Lorraine A. DarConte Posted: Jul 01, 2008 0 comments

A. T. (Tom) Willett and Jeff Smith are commercial photographers whose clients include Humana (insurance), Getty Assignments, Tucson Guide, More Magazine, the Arizona Public Service (APS), and the University of Arizona. The duo met more than 20 years ago while attending Pima Community College in Tucson.

Both moved to the small city when they were young (Willett from...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

In a career spanning 40 years, Jeff Smith's work as an industrial and corporate photographer is well-known to many. Not too long ago we'd find him going to a job site with literally almost a half-ton of lighting gear, along with a Mamiya RZ67 and heavy lenses, not to mention countless packs of film and Polaroids. Over the years the market has shifted, technology has...

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Joe Farace Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

"Silver white winters that melt into springs."--Oscar Hammerstein II

The idea behind this story was to provide insight into the photo gear I own and use, all of which was purchased from Shutterbug advertisers. During the review process many different photographic products pass through my hands but contrary to what you may think they don't stay there...

Steve Bedell Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Like most photographers, I like to play around and constantly explore Photoshop. But I'm a businessman, too, so I need to be careful about how much time I spend in front of the computer. The more time I spend there, the less I have for taking photos and marketing my services, and that's where I make money. So I've always adopted the philosophy of getting it right...

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Howard Millard Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Putting two or more captures on top of each other in a single image multiplies the potential for impact and opens up new avenues to creative expression. Whether you want to inject motion into a static shot, add moody atmosphere or dreamy nostalgia, or enhance one subject with the texture of another, multiple exposure offers a myriad of possibilities. The techniques complement...

Brad Perks Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Rainbows have inspired legends of luck and good fortune. The beautiful colors are created in a simple process. Capturing a rainbow with your camera takes a bit of that good luck.

Rainbows require two simple ingredients--sunlight and raindrops. They combine at just the right angle to colonize a beautiful picture. The colors are formed when...

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Norm Haughey Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

The impact and success of a studio portrait is often the combined result of lighting, composition, body language, lens choice, camera angle, clothing, color, texture, and even luck. With a few portrait techniques under your belt, however, your luck will improve dramatically. There are many portrait-making methods that can help you develop your own style over time and ultimately...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Here are a few things AJ Neste's learned about photographing surfers:
One, it's the singer, not the song. "The most important part of being successful at this," he says, "is knowing the surfer. It's not just showing up somewhere and taking photos of random surfers. You won't know their personal style."

...

Scott Stulberg Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Being a photography instructor is very rewarding and has proved to be an inspiration to me. Teaching Digital Photography at UCLA Extension in Los Angeles, I have found the interaction with students benefited me at least as much as them. But what if someone wants to take your class and is halfway around the world? That is where online teaching comes in and I am lucky enough to have...

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Howard Millard Posted: Apr 01, 2008 0 comments

Albert Watson's powerful vision bridges the worlds of darkroom and digital. With more than 250 Vogue covers to his credit, three award-winning books, more than 650 commercials and music videos, he is a reigning master of both stunning black and white and cutting-edge color. His advertising clients include Chanel, Levi's, Gap, and Revlon, and his editorial work ranges...

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John Neubauer Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

The scenery rolls by quickly, too quickly really, to take in the fullness of any one moment. One scene quickly becomes part of the one just rushing by, which too quickly becomes part of another. Vast stretches of farmland push against distant mountain ranges, workers labor freshly plowed and watered fields, burros pull plows, squat villages flash by, then in quick succession...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

In a previous column I covered some of the online options you have for showing your images. The services I covered then didn't give you many options for layout and design of your web galleries, but do get you online quickly with a professional look and feel. What about those of you who have a hosting service that doesn't provide for a gallery? We'll take a look...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

Anyone who's watched Mark Steines co-anchor Entertainment Tonight knows he's remarkably at ease in front of the camera. Thing is, he may be even more comfortable behind it, especially if that camera is his digital SLR.

Not only that, he may be happier back there.

It is, after all, where he began. "Photography's...

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Joseph Meehan Posted: Mar 01, 2008 0 comments

I have always been fascinated by how differently other photographers portray the same subjects that I photograph. Indeed, my office shelves are crammed with books and magazines with such images. Many of these pictures have influenced how I think about the visual world and how various photographic tools can be used. I am particularly attracted to pictures that convey something...

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