Pro Techniques

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David FitzSimmons Posted: Aug 01, 2009 0 comments

This emotional rush that comes with first seeing a waterfall—and then the incurable urge to find as many vantage points as possible around it—compelled me to begin documenting these secluded, sibilant landscapes. You see, I have always loved waterfalls. When I was younger, my parents loaded the three boys in the family station wagon, “the boat,” as we called it, pointed...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jul 01, 2009 0 comments

Working at Spiratone, Nick Koudis (www.koudis.com) began his photographic career designing many of those wonderful gizmos made popular by my mentor, the world-renowned Norman Rothschild. Koudis brought his knack for developing clever and ingenious gadgets with him when he opened his first studio in New York City over 25 years ago. Back then we...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

Dear Mr. King,
When I saw Chris Alvanas’s HDR (High Dynamic Range) photographs, my first thought was, they could be covers of Stephen King novels. They held mystery and more than a hint of menace; they suggested a story that would keep me turning pages long into the night.

What’s HDR photography? It’s a technique that makes possible...

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Fred Collins Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

When I think about all of the photography equipment I have added to my collection over the years—cameras, lenses, lights—I would have to put my finger on the raw conversion window in Photoshop as probably the most effective tool I currently have for making my images look good. It has even lightened the load in terms of the amount of equipment I use for taking the shot in the first...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Jun 01, 2009 1 comments

I don’t know of any other film brand that also became the title of a hit song like Paul Simon’s “Kodachrome,” released in 1973.

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Fredrik Froman Posted: Jun 01, 2009 0 comments

When most people are getting their best sleep and the early birds are cuddling in their warm beds or having their first cup of coffee, low-light photographers get their best pictures. There is nothing like standing in a big city in the middle of the night before the city wakes up and shooting low-light photography. I love the feeling of experiencing something not everybody sees. If you...

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Jack Neubart Posted: May 01, 2009 1 comments

“I’ve always loved cars,” Charles Hopkins proclaims. “Besides, who wouldn’t like having access to the latest vehicles before anyone else has even heard about them?” It was when he arrived in Los Angeles that Hopkins took that passion one step further. He’d joined up with photographers who specialized in automotive photography and honed his skills. He went...

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George Schaub Posted: May 01, 2009 1 comments

For the past three summer seasons Canon has sponsored their Photography in the Parks Photo Contest, highlighting images made by photographers in our nation’s national parks.

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

After a while, showing wasn’t enough. Telling became the point.

And because Chris Heisey knows his Civil War, he has a lot to tell in his photographs.

Chris has been photographing Civil War battlefields for almost 20 years, and at the start he took straightforward record shots. “I’m self-taught,” he says, “and...

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Efrain M. Padro Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

Comprised of almost 390,000 square miles (slightly bigger than France and Germany put together), Patagonia is located in the southernmost third of both Argentina and Chile. Here the Andes Mountains plunge into the Pacific Ocean, leaving a trail of glaciated valleys, rugged granite peaks, ancient glaciers, jade green lakes, and endless plains. This stark and surreal landscape is also rich in...

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Jody Gomez Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

“I’ve done the calculations time and again,” Gomez says, “and I couldn’t run my own site for anywhere near the cost.”

The photographic career of Jody Gomez started off simply enough, as a spectator parent when her son began riding steers. Frustrated by the poor quality of the pictures snapped and sold by another parent, Gomez began taking her own...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the traditional compositional guidelines that many artists and photographers adhere to is that a subject’s movement should go toward the center of the frame. You can see this method of composing an image in the photo of the frigate bird (#1) that I placed on the left side of the frame; it is flying toward the imaginary vertical center line of the image. Similarly, I placed the tall...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The who, what, when, and where of the story are easy.

Commercial and advertising photographer Charles Orrico was commissioned about two years ago by an ad agency to photograph at the abandoned Kings Park Psychiatric Center in Kings Park, New York, on behalf of a holding company that planned to develop the site. Building 93, the main structure in the complex, was of special...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

SBA means “Shake Begins At”—the level at which camera movement makes your images lose the sharpness battle.

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the things that makes a photograph successful is that attention is directed to the subject. This can be done with good lighting, muted backgrounds, or graphic design. An important design element that directs our attention into the heart of a picture is called a leading line. This is a line that usually begins at the bottom of the composition and extends into the heart of the scene...

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