Show Reports

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2011 2 comments

In our recent photokina reports (January, 2011, issue) we covered products and trends at the show. Here’s a brief follow-up on some film and paper processing items and information on friends old and new, present and gone.

In our photokina reports we mentioned Kodak’s new film, of course, and Harman’s Direct Positive paper, and...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

There’s a new kid on the block when it comes to tripods, and they’re impressive, both in design and philosophy. Redged was founded in Holland by a nature photographer (Ed Dorrestein) and a sports and reportage photographer (Bart Bel) in order to get the kinds of tripods they personally wanted.

We weren’t the only ones who were impressed. This was...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Let’s consider, to start, the humble camera strap. Several models of sling strap were shown, designed to carry the camera over your shoulder and under your arm or even on your hip.

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

One of the great things about photokina is that you find a lot of “straws in the wind”: not necessarily major introductions from major manufacturers, but intriguing indicators of which way the wind is blowing.

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Countless things appear at photokina that are not cameras, lenses, tripods, bags, materials, or lighting and studio. It’s part of the magic of the place. Calling this category “accessories” won’t do, because for most of us, “accessories” consist mostly of small things in blister packs: cable releases, lens caps, that sort of thing. At photokina, it can...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

In all probability, most photographers could gain more from investing in lighting equipment than from investing in new cameras. Not professionals, perhaps, though studio lighting continues to come on in leaps and bounds, but countless amateurs could greatly improve both the range and quality of their work.

George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2011 3 comments

Our show report this year is an amalgam of product news and trend spotting, which pretty much reflects what photokina has stood for in our minds. The sense of a United Nations of photography still prevails at this increasingly European-directed show, but the image and its uses is still the universal tie that binds.

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 0 comments

Perhaps the hardest thing to convey about photokina is just how wide-ranging it is. Where else are you going to get an opinion, from a factory representative, about how much longer film coating is going to survive in Iran? The answer, incidentally, was “maybe two to three years.” Did you even know there was a coating line in Iran? Then there are Romanian photo-book machines, Turkish...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

The weirdest camera at the show, the GFAE, wasn’t even recognizable as a camera, not least because it was a view camera with the bellows left out in order to show its construction more clearly. We’ll come back to it later, but first, let’s look at some more conventional offerings.

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

What’s new and different in gadgets and accessories this year? While digital has overtaken cameras it seems that many of the accessories we saw could be used as much on a film as a digital camera, proving that while there might not be much new under the sun there are certainly variations that bend with the technological tide.

Alpine Innovations’ D-Pod is an interesting...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2010 2 comments

Just when I thought I’d seen it all, along come camera bags that capture my attention. Photo backpacks are sporting new looks that are designed to reduce back strain. Messenger bags are seeing a resurgence, doing double duty as laptop and camera bag, while maintaining their svelte lines. The more conventional shoulder bag, however, is still on the scene for those who prefer tradition while...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 2 comments

There are a couple of new printers aimed at the event photographer market, and there are plenty of media options as well for snapshot to fine art printers. And, the photo book industry is taking off—there were more book printing options available than ever before, both for the portrait/wedding photographer with companies like Fujifilm, HP, Kodak, and Lucidiom all having offerings in both...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

This year we’re seeing a surprising number of new ringlights plus lots of accessory light modifiers, dedicated cords, flash brackets, and continuous LED lights which are helpful when making videos with multipurpose D-SLR cameras.

Aputure’s Trigmaster makes controlling a studio strobe or Speedlight wirelessly easier at distances of up to 300 feet with 16 different...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

The big news is the availability of the new standard in Secure Digital (SD) memory—SDXC. SDXC is currently supported by only a small number of cameras, like the Panasonic GH1 (not surprising given that Panasonic is one of the main proponents of the new memory format). The cards look physically the same as SD and SDHC cards, but they have a new format that promises large data storage...

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