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Jason Schneider Posted: Jun 01, 2008 1 comments

What happens in Vegas is supposed to stay there--unless it happens to be one of the eight hot new D-SLRs that debuted at the annual PMA Show. Yes, 2008 is shaping up as a banner year for the expanding D-SLR sector and neither the pace of D-SLR sales nor the advancing technology that goes along with it is showing any sign of slowing down.

With eight new D-SLR...

Shutterbug Staff Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

As part of our annual Photo Marketing Association (PMA) coverage we ask our reporters to deliver a "Best of Show" award. While each contributor had their own beat, we also asked them to go beyond their respective area of coverage to find what, for them, signified a breakthrough product, technology, or new trend that they felt would affect all photographers in the...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2008 0 comments

This report covers back-up systems and all sorts of storage devices, beginning with USB flash (thumb/pen) and handheld devices. In terms of backup, there was only one hardware solution worthy of note, plus a related product that uses DVDs. Beyond that, there are the plethora of digital photo frames, making it one of the hottest product categories at this year's show.
...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2005 3 comments

"New at PMA `05: Film!"--Headline in Convention Daily Newspaper

In the entire history of the PMA show this is the first time no new 35mm film SLRs were introduced, so ya gotta wonder what the dude who wrote that was smoking. According to the British Journal of Photography, the manufacture of Contax and Kyocera 35mm film cameras has...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

One trend has continued unabated since the first Shutterbug's Photography Buyer's Guide: As the number of digital cameras has increased, the number of scanners has decreased. My guess is that while the presence of camera-phone manufacturers at PMA 2005 does not bode well for the future of lower end point-and-shoot cameras, they will have no impact whatsoever on the...

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2005 2 comments

Tripods are important, but for most people they tend to blur together. The most important news is always that tripods are getting lighter. There are many more companies offering carbon-fiber tripods, increasingly with magnesium-alloy metal work. And while Gitzo's Basalt range gives a more modest savings in weight, it has the same desirable "deadness"...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Must-Have Photo Gadgets
Another edition of the biggest photo show in the U.S.A. has come and gone. As always in recent years, it was huge with thousands of products being hawked for photo buffs of all types. Even so, a number of people I spoke with thought this show was noticeably smaller in size than prior annual PMA trade shows and I would have to agree...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

According to a report published by the Photo Marketing Association (PMA), some 82 percent of cameras sold in 2005 will be digital. The study also indicates that many consumers are already buying their second or third digicams, making the full-featured, high-resolution models increasingly popular. Consequently, I was not surprised to find numerous new cameras at PMA 2005 with...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

"Has digital photography reached the end of the road?"--Headline in Convention Daily Newspaper

When you read such erudite comments in the trade press, a person might wonder if we have, in fact, reached digital nirvana. Maybe that writer's grandpa posed the same question when wet collodion plates were introduced, but digital imaging is...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

"Don't call 'em D-SLRs, in the future all SLRs will be digital."--Overheard at PMA

A recent New Yorker cartoon showed a salesperson demonstrating a digicam to a customer. The caption read something like, "This light comes on to tell you when the camera is obsolete." A lot of digital SLR owners feel like that from time to...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Surprisingly, one or two companies I'd seen at PMA the previous year were noticeably absent this time around, but in their stead were several distributors and manufacturers displaying new studio products. Mobility stood at the forefront in some booths, economical studio flash alternatives in the form of the ever popular but more modestly priced (e.g., amateur friendly)...

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Shutterbug Staff Posted: May 01, 2005 Published: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Manufacturers And Distributors

Manufacturers And Distributors

AgfaPhoto USA Corp.
100 Challenger Rd.
Ridgefield Park, NJ 07660
(800) 243-2652
(201) 440-2500

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: May 01, 2005 Published: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Weird stuff is my favorite category at any show: the things that don't fit into sensible categories, but are useful, or unusual, or yes, just plain weird. Some manufacturers of weird stuff rejoice in being called weird (they are often the most fun of all) but others sometimes flinch and say things like, "Um, we'd prefer to be called, er, unique." At a...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

Considering the overwhelming popularity of digital SLR cameras, it's understandable that all lens manufacturers are devoting their resources to this market. All of the new products--featuring entirely new designs--shown during PMA 2005 were exclusively for use with digital SLRs that employ the APS-C size sensor; these are not suitable for use with film-based...

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Joe Farace Posted: Jun 01, 2005 0 comments

What is the state of the art for imaging software? At PMA 2005 it seems concentrated at the low end (under $99) with just a few, OK maybe one product aimed at the high end. What's left is a Grand Canyon of opportunity in the middle that might just be filled with free open-source software such as The Gimp (www.gimp.org)...

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