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Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 1 comments

There are a couple of new printers aimed at the event photographer market, and there are plenty of media options as well for snapshot to fine art printers. And, the photo book industry is taking off—there were more book printing options available than ever before, both for the portrait/wedding photographer with companies like Fujifilm, HP, Kodak, and Lucidiom all having offerings in both...

Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

This year we’re seeing a surprising number of new ringlights plus lots of accessory light modifiers, dedicated cords, flash brackets, and continuous LED lights which are helpful when making videos with multipurpose D-SLR cameras.

Aputure’s Trigmaster makes controlling a studio strobe or Speedlight wirelessly easier at distances of up to 300 feet with 16 different...

Jon Canfield Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

The big news is the availability of the new standard in Secure Digital (SD) memory—SDXC. SDXC is currently supported by only a small number of cameras, like the Panasonic GH1 (not surprising given that Panasonic is one of the main proponents of the new memory format). The cards look physically the same as SD and SDHC cards, but they have a new format that promises large data storage...

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Robert E. Mayer Posted: Jun 01, 2010 1 comments

Photographers are notorious gadget hounds, always seeking some new little item that will help them in their quest to produce even better images. Following are unusual items that should help fill the average photographer’s need of something new and different.

Want to be able to see exactly what your D-SLR’s LCD is seeing, from over 300 feet away? And be able to...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

While there are no revolutionary designs in tripods, monopods, and heads this year (unlike the introduction of the Novoflex four-legged tripod last year), manufacturers have not sat idly. They continue to address the needs of studio photographers but appear to be placing even greater emphasis on travel photography.

Notably, we’re beginning to see more subcompact tripods...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

A good example of how digital picture frames have changed from passive displays with looping slide shows to interactive devices is the “concept” frame system from Casio, dubbed the Digital Art Frame. The frame supports playback of Adobe’s Flash Lite 3.1 content, with future plans for network downloads. Currently you have access to different types of clocks and calendars for...

Jack Neubart Posted: Jun 01, 2010 0 comments

This year saw few major product launches in studio lighting, although we did manage to uncover some interesting lights and accessories nonetheless.

Dot Line Corp./RPS Studio introduced the Complete 7-in-1 Reflector. This folding reflector comes with a translucent panel, white, silver, sunlight (a mix of gold and silver), and gold reflectors, plus an 18 percent gray target for...

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Staff Posted: Feb 01, 2010 0 comments

The Road to Freedom: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement, 1956-1968 features 150 vintage photographs that portray the struggles and aspirations of that historic time.

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

As the price of D-SLRs and high-resolution digicams drops to more affordable levels, an increasing number of families and serious photo enthusiasts want a better photo printer. We found lots of new machines at the photokina show, some with high-tech features such as Wi-Fi and Ethernet compatibility. Lack of space precludes coverage of every new product, but the following printers are worth...

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Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

Every photokina, we are assigned a category that for want of a better term we call “weird and wonderful.” It’s stuff that doesn’t easily fit into any other category, or differs so much from the mass of its competitors that it deserves special mention.

Some products are just bizarre: we’ll come to what we thought was the most bizarre trend at the end...

George Schaub Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

The photokina trade fair held in Cologne, Germany, every two years has a solid reputation for previews and announcements meant to shake up the practices and worldviews of photographers, be they amateur or pro. This can come in the form of products real and imagined, with some making it to shelves and others just a wistful dream of designers and engineers who hope what they propose will become the...

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

One of the great pleasures of photokina is finding really brilliant new accessories. Some are completely unexpected. Others, you’ve wanted for years but have never been able to find—often because until now, the technology needed to build them has not been available.

A shining example (literally) of the latter, and the accessory hit of the show as far as I am concerned...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Jan 01, 2009 1 comments

Let’s start with the cheapest Large Format (LF) camera at the show, and, as far as I am concerned, the one that is likely to be of the most interest to the largest number of our readers: the Bulldog 10x8” camera (also available in 8x10” for the American market—it’s a reversing back and can be used either way). The UK price is £250, which means that although a...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

Although digicams with built-in lenses still outsell D-SLRs by 10 to 1, market research indicates that 20 percent of consumers are planning to upgrade to an interchangeable-lens camera. As a result, most manufacturers are devoting significant R&D efforts to the D-SLR category, and we found some really desirable new cameras at photokina. The trend was toward more of the high-tech...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jan 01, 2009 0 comments

Because of the increasing resolution and burst speed of some new cameras, the capacity and speed of memory cards continues to increase. While a super-fast card cannot boost a camera’s maximum framing rate, the extra card speed can provide greater burst depth (more frames in a long series) and shorter data recording times. A high-speed card is also ideal after a long trip, when you’re...

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