Film Photography Reviews

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Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 20, 2014 0 comments

Ilford Photo recently confirmed reports that there are no plans to discontinue production of their XP2 SUPER film. The product is in free supply globally from Ilford Photo distributors and retailers.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Aug 21, 2014 0 comments

Kodak Alaris has announced that—due to a steady decline in sales and customer usage—it is discontinuing the popular Kodak Professional BW400CN film.

Peter K. Burian Posted: Sep 01, 2004 0 comments

Until recently, all of Kodak's professional color print films were marketed under the Portra logo, understandable because portrait and wedding photographers make up the primary market for such products. That changed earlier this year, when the company...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Dateline 1940: "The fastest film in the world is the new Tri-X, with twice the speed of Super-XX." If you want the numbers, the British Journal of Photography Almanac for 1940 (actually written in 1939) reckoned it was 7000 H&D.

That's right. Tri-X was...

Steve Bedell Posted: Jul 01, 2004 0 comments

Regular readers will note that my articles are usually about techniques, not test reports. But when there's a new film out there for portrait photographers, that's right up my alley. The majority of my work is portraiture and I've long...

Joe Farace Posted: Sep 01, 2009 1 comments

At photokina in September 2008 Kodak announced its Professional Ektar film in 35mm format.

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Sep 01, 2009 0 comments

Kodak’s new Ektar 100 is a film of unparalleled fine grain, very high sharpness, and excellent color rendition.

Steve Anchell Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

It is interesting that as digital imaging began its ascendancy film reached an all-time high in quality: hue, saturation, and sharpness, all of which meant digital had to try harder to be better. One of the films that stood out were the Kodak Professional Portra color negative emulsions, which in the last 10 years have become a favorite for photographers worldwide.

 

So...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: May 01, 2008 0 comments

Film photographers are a cantankerous and ungrateful crew, often greeting revised films with suspicion and resentment instead of hope and pleasure. To some extent this is understandable, because they usually have to establish new development times and possibly new exposure indices, too; but the manufacturers' claimed improvements are usually honest, and without them...

Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2004 0 comments

Maco is not a name that is particularly familiar to most zphotographers--and those who do know the name are inclined to say "great products, shame about the documentation." Examples of the shortcomings of the latter are easy to find. For example, the same film-developer...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Nov 01, 2003 0 comments

Agfa manufactures a full line of 35mm films of all types, with the Vista series being their most popular consumer-grade product. In 2001, Vista was chosen as "European Color Print Film of the Year," by EISA, a group composed of some 50 magazines. Since that time, Vista 100, 200...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Mar 01, 2000 0 comments

Although Fujichrome Provia 100 Professional is a top-rated transparency film, the engineers at Fuji have not been resting on their laurels. Aggressively continuing their Research and Development activity, they achieved a breakthrough: an ISO 100 film with...

Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

Until about five years ago, any color print film with an ISO over 200 was considered to be in the "high-speed" category. Then, the many ISO 1000 and 800 films hit the market, and eventually, the ISO 400 products were defined as medium...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 1998 5 comments

There are those who say that there really isn't any reason, anymore, to go into the darkroom to tone prints. After all, you can sit in front of the computer and change color balance, alter brightness and contrast, and bend curves to get all kinds of...

Shutterbug Staff Posted: Nov 01, 2005 0 comments

Chemistry--especially black and white chemistry--remains defiantly buoyant. Although chemicals for color printing are unmistakably in decline, and although domestic processing kits for slide film (Kodak E-6 compatible) and negative film (Kodak C-41 compatible) are harder and harder to find in large packages (5 liters and above), monochrome chemicals continue to flourish.

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