Film & Darkroom Gear

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Frances E. Schultz Posted: Nov 01, 2004 0 comments

A 50th anniversary is something very special: a golden anniversary, which is a good trick for something made of silver, is what Kodak Tri-X celebrates this year. The first of the X-films was Panatomic-X in 1938. Two-thirds of a century later, there's some doubt about what the X was for: probably "Extra," as it was faster and sharper and finer grained than the...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

Although the slide films of early 1998 were already excellent, the "big three" manufacturers continue to enhance their emulsions. Agfa for example had a winner with its Agfachrome RSX 100 Professional, which won the prestigious European Photo...

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Dave Howard Posted: Dec 01, 2005 0 comments

There's no question that enlarger manufacturing is, shall we say, no longer a growth industry.

Ironically, it's the most technically advanced enlarger models that have been falling by the wayside. Their complements of sophisticated on-board electronics and baseboard analyzer/control modules have been superceded by desktop and laptop computers running...

Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jun 01, 2006 0 comments

While digital, as expected, dominated the show, silver-halide materials were still to be found. These included three new films; faster films in single-use cameras; a new 35mm film support to reduce static (and therefore dust); new archival storage materials; the promise of new papers; and even--somewhat to my surprise--a lonely enlarger on one of the Chinese stands.

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Dave Howard Posted: Oct 01, 2000 0 comments

Dunco isn't exactly a household word among photographers on the west side of the Atlantic. My first exposure to the brand was at the 1994 photokina show in Ger-many, where I discovered their line of medium format enlargers and adjustable printing easels.

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Roger W. Hicks Posted: Feb 01, 2008 0 comments

There is a saying: remember, you are unique, just like every other human being. There is also the question of how far we are shaped by our genes, and how far by our upbringing.

Similar observations apply to infrared (IR) films. No two emulsions are quite the same (genetic uniqueness), and even with the same emulsion, each photographer has a different regime for...

Roger W. Hicks & Frances E. Schultz Posted: Jan 01, 2011 1 comments

Let’s be honest. One thing no one would have expected at photokina was a unique new black-and-white silver halide process. But that’s what we got. Well, not exactly brand new. It’s a revival of a technology that hasn’t been seen in decades, quite possibly not in the lifetime of many of our readers: direct reversal paper.

Cynthia Boylan Posted: Jul 30, 2014 1 comments

Some classic slide films never goes out of style. Or at least that’s what Lomography is hoping now that it’s now brought back Agfa CT Precisa color 35mm slide film. Best known the cool blue tone effect it produces in photos – such as the pumped up blues in images of skies – Agfa CT Precisa also has a fine grain quality and is available in ISO 100.

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2002 0 comments

First Look ASF 35mm Film Kiosk

The long-anticipated Applied Science Fiction Digital PIC kiosk has been placed in various retail sites around the country. We recently attended a test site demo in New York City. The kiosk uses the company's patented system for converting exposed 35mm...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2000 0 comments

Until recently, ISO 400 seemed to be the uppermost limit in terms of film speed for excellent print quality in 8x12" reproductions. However, there are many advantages to shooting with an ISO 800 film: less risk of blur from camera shake, greater...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Jun 01, 1999 0 comments

If you'll allow me a little history, let me reminisce for a moment. The first article I did for Shutterbug was in the late '80s. It was about shooting Kodak VPH 400 film at weddings. The film was a big step forward in shooting candid type...

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Jay Abend Posted: Nov 01, 2002 0 comments

I knew this would happen. I knew that just as digital cameras got really good and really inexpensive we'd see lots of great film stock. I'll admit that my own shooting, whether for clients or personal amusement, is mostly digital...

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Peter K. Burian Posted: Jul 01, 2001 0 comments

Over the past two years, we have seen significant improvements in all ISO 400 and 800 color print films, but few advances in the "fast" color reversal products. This is understandable because color neg film outsells slide film by a vast...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2007 0 comments

Last year we reported that Fujifilm had promised to be the "last man standing" when it came to maintaining and introducing new films, and we are happy to report that their promise has been kept. With a recently introduced Fujichrome Provia 400 and a return of Fujichrome Velvia 50, the company continues to upgrade its chrome film line with new emulsions that improve...

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George Schaub Posted: Oct 01, 2005 0 comments

Many moons ago I was granted a few test rolls of the then-new Fujichrome Velvia 50. I happened to be in Las Vegas at the time, and curious just how saturated this touted high-saturation film might be I hiked around red rock country and exposed a few rolls. Having been a dedicated slide shooter and film tester for another photo mag I was pretty familiar with slide films and how...

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