Pro Techniques

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Sep 01, 2007 6 comments

An educator since the early 1960s, Jerry Uelsmann began assembling his photographs from multiple negatives decades before digital tools like Photoshop were available. Using as many as seven enlargers to expose a single print, his darkroom skills allowed him to create evocative images that combined the realism of photography and the fluidity of our dreams.

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Phillip Andrews Posted: Sep 01, 2007 0 comments

There is no doubt that a well-crafted lith print is, to borrow an oft-used phrase from my father-in-law, "a thing of beauty is (therefore) a joy forever." The trick, for the experienced and occasional darkroom users alike, is the production of such a print. I have always had difficulty getting consistency with the production of my prints. Despite this frustration, my...

Steve Bedell Posted: Sep 01, 2007 2 comments

Digital has created a tremendous amount of change in the last few years, and photographers who have not been quick to adapt have lost business and, perhaps more importantly, business opportunities. The landscape has changed dramatically, and the people doing professional photography range from MWACs (Moms With A Camera) who work for practically nothing or for friends to very...

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Jon Canfield Posted: Aug 01, 2007 0 comments

It's probably no surprise to most of you, but in today's digital world, having a website is almost a requirement if you're to be considered a pro or more than a casual snapshooter. Many publications and image purchasers don't want to deal with looking at contact sheets or browsing at images on a CD or DVD--aside from the task of inserting and reading...

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Scott Stulberg Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Mirroring photos has always been one of my favorite techniques, and it is a relatively easy way to come up with some fun and creative images. Mirroring images consists of duplicating part of a photograph and flipping it around in different ways to create a mirrored effect. I use all kinds of subjects for these creations and I am constantly looking for things that would produce...

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Steve Gottlieb Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

In the last several years, the digital revolution has completely changed how photo books and albums are created...and change has been for the better in every respect. It's out with the old--covers without images, prints painstakingly glued in or slipped into boring 4x6" sleeves, improvised captioning (often by hand), heavy pages (often with unappealing acetate...

Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Consistently achieving accurate color may be digital photography's most difficult skill to master. Shooting the same subject under different lighting conditions can cause unacceptable color variations which can be difficult and time consuming to correct later. Digital cameras have many more color balance options than film ever did, but when the ambient lighting changes from...

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Joseph A. Dickerson Posted: Jun 01, 2007 0 comments

Last year I wrote about one of my favorite software programs, Panorama Maker 3. The folks at ArcSoft have unveiled an updated Version 4 ($39.99 new, $24.99 upgrade), so I thought I'd give it a try.

Version 4 is more intuitive than Version 3, and that's really saying something. The first couple of panoramas I tried went together easily, but I noticed that...

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Jim Mitchell Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

I don't know if I have found my photographic "vision" yet, but I have definitely found my obsession. For me, it began five years ago when I bought my first sophisticated 35mm SLR film camera. Before then my photographic experience had been limited to the typical point-and-shoot family snapshots, but with this new camera something "clicked" (other than...

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Jon Canfield Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

To work along you can right click on the image below, and Save Picture As...


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Jon Canfield Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

Image theft is a real concern for many people. Anyone who has a website, posts a photo to one of the many sharing sites, or even e-mails a photo to someone is at risk of their image being used without permission. And, if they aren't asking for permission, you can bet they aren't planning to pay you for the fair use of your work.

As if this wasn't...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: May 01, 2007 0 comments

Water. Even a small amount can turn your favorite camera into a worthless, grisly paperweight.

If your camera gear gets in the drink, there's only a slim chance you can save it. But you can improve your odds if you follow these tips.

Act Fast
If your camera gets wet, it's important to act quickly. If you're outdoors...

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Maria Piscopo Posted: May 01, 2007 1 comments

The legal issues of privacy rights and copyrights in photography are usually not covered thoroughly enough in photo schools. Many professionals don't take the time to learn the law. This often leads to confusion and chaos when photographers start selling their work. Whether you are part-time or full-time, amateur or pro, one of the most important legal issues you will...

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Ralph J. Adkins Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

My life in photography changed one fall morning at the Frederick County Fair. A numbness on my right side indicated that I was joining the more than 600,000 people nationwide who suffer from strokes each year.

Thankfully, others around me recognized the first signs of my stroke and rushed me to a nearby hospital. During my 25-day hospital stay, I had ample time to...

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Apr 01, 2007 1 comments

Capturing the beauty of artwork with a camera has always been a challenge. Sure, it's easy to take a picture of a picture, but to reproduce the full range of colors, textures, and tones that will carry the power of the original, that is a challenge. There is a growing demand for high-quality digital files for juried shows, portfolios, and even for limited edition inkjet...

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