Pro Techniques

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Chris Maher and Larry Berman Posted: Apr 01, 2007 1 comments

Capturing the beauty of artwork with a camera has always been a challenge. Sure, it's easy to take a picture of a picture, but to reproduce the full range of colors, textures, and tones that will carry the power of the original, that is a challenge. There is a growing demand for high-quality digital files for juried shows, portfolios, and even for limited edition inkjet...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2007 0 comments

As a newspaper photographer, you never know when you show up in the morning what you're going to be working on--sometimes it's an environmental portrait, other times a feature, or a documentary image that is posed," San Francisco-based Peter DaSilva says.

"Whatever it is, I need to produce a picture of quality every time I'm sent...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

Two-time American poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Stanley Kunitz collaborated with noted Boston photographer Marnie Crawford Samuelson to translate a man's life and his garden into a profound and touching union.

"Something was obsessing me to want to photograph Stanley Kunitz in that garden on Cape Cod," Crawford Samuelson says, "a chance...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

"I built my name and reputation on safety and doing things legally, with permission."

Location is everything, and Peter B. Kaplan built his career on getting to places others couldn't...or wouldn't. Although there are images taken from blimps, balloons, and helicopters, the majority of his photographs are taken from rooftops, scaffolds, antenna...

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Theresa Airey Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

I started out my photographic career in 1980 and studied with some of the most prominent photographers of our time. I learned to previsualize my images and was rewarded with perfectly "zoned" black and white negatives. However, I was never satisfied with my black and white prints. I always wanted more and felt something was missing. I began translating the negative...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

When we heard that David Alan Harvey was doing a book on women, it didn't seem like a surprising subject. A photojournalist with over 30 National Geographic stories to his credit, plus several books, we imagined that in the course of over 30 years of travel and photography he'd have many compelling images from which to choose. Not to mention current assignments that...

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Dick Stanley Posted: Mar 01, 2007 0 comments

In 30 years of taking photographs I have always been more or less indifferent to the camera I use. Various instamatics have been my mainstay, and sometimes I end up using a disposable camera. I have nothing against a good camera: I own one (with only a 135mm lens), and sometimes borrow others. The indifference to the camera comes from the fact that the images that attract me are...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Sooner or later, you're going to be tempted to buy a product that's labeled "refurbished." It will probably be the lower price that attracts you--after all, there is one and only one reason to even consider "refurb" and that is to save money. Depending on where you shop, you may be led to believe that the refurbished item is as good as...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

They call him the picture taker, a humble phrase for a man whose every image is a small miracle. His name is Ken Elkins, retired chief photographer for The Anniston Star in rural Alabama. His new book, appropriately titled Picture Taker (published by The University of Alabama Press), transports us from life as we know it to a world most of us will never encounter.

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Neela Bhagat Posted: Feb 01, 2007 0 comments

Henry Hamilton Bennett's photographs have been collected and displayed in some of the most prestigious museums around the world, including the New York Museum of Modern Art, the Center for Creative Photography, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress. His original photographs have found their way into many private collections.

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Tom Frier Posted: Feb 01, 2007 9 comments

Photography has long been a passion and one of my favorite subjects is the classic automobile. My interest is not so much in the mechanical aspects but in their design and form. Since I was introduced to the magical world of digital I have developed a new approach to this subject matter, one that extracts the car from its surroundings and considers it as an object of beauty onto...

Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Feb 01, 2007 3 comments

I went into this determined not to portray fine art photographer Chris Faust as some sort of oddity because, lo and behold, he still goes into the darkroom. And as a photography teacher, he encourages others to do it, too.

But when I said, "I'm not going to approach this story as if you were an oddity in the age of digital," he stopped me with...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Jan 01, 2007 0 comments

"How do you get a handle on telling the story of life on earth in images? It took tons of research to master the material."

For his most recent book, Life: A Journey Through Time, Frans Lanting traveled, researched, and photographed for over six years, but when you consider that his goal was to document the story of life on earth, it seems a reasonable amount...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 15, 2006 Published: Dec 01, 2006 4 comments

Changing lenses on a digital SLR subjects the interior to invasion by dust and other airborne particles. While we can avoid the problem with prudent handling, eventually we'll have to face the facts: dust will get on the sensor. The imaging sensor, whether CCD or CMOS, is a dust magnet. As soon as the camera is turned on the sensor becomes electrostatically charged. Any...

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Jay McCabe Posted: Nov 01, 2006 0 comments

"Photographers may believe in certain pictures, but they have to have the educated eye of the picture editor."

"We're actually looking at film," David Doubilet says. He's at the offices of National Geographic magazine, going over the take from a recent two-month assignment in the South Pacific. The job was shot with both film and...

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