Pro Techniques

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 0 comments

When scene contrast is high there may be a danger of overexposure, particularly when you do not take care to read the highlight values to keep them well within the dynamic range capability of the sensor. When overexposure is extreme you lose detail in the subject, cause the image to look harsh, and may eliminate the possibility of making a good print from the photo, despite your best processing...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Nov 01, 2008 3 comments

“You need to establish a connection with the food in front of the camera,” observes New York-based food photographer Francesco Tonelli (www.francescotonelli.com). “I can do a better job photographing a dish when I can picture myself eating it. That’s the frame of mind I need to be in so that I can capture the...

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Daryl Hawk Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

The brilliant, ever-elusive emerald green and red quetzal. Mist enshrouded cloud forests that evoke a mysterious and eerie beauty. The melodic song of the bellbird. Howler monkeys calling to each other in their distinctive, bellowing way. These are just some of the images that describe the lovely Central American country of Costa Rica.

For over 25 years I have...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Nov 01, 2008 1 comments

Stuck in traffic one day on Sunset Boulevard, Patrick Ecclesine got an idea. Thinking about the street—“twenty-four miles from the barrio to the beach,” he writes at his website (www.ecclesine.com), “through some of the poorest neighborhoods in the city to some of the richest neighborhoods in the world”—two...

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Jody Gomez Posted: Nov 01, 2008 0 comments

The photographic career of Jody Gomez started off simply enough, as a spectator parent when her son began riding steers. Frustrated by the poor quality of the pictures snapped and sold by another parent, Gomez began taking her own photographs, starting off with an entry-level 35mm Canon Rebel. In short order, Gomez was installed as the official photographer for the California Junior Bull Riders...

Norm Haughey Posted: Oct 01, 2008 3 comments

As mentioned in the previous tutorials, the impact and success of a studio portrait is often the combined result of lighting, composition, body language, lens choice, camera angle, clothing, color, texture, and even luck. Armed with a few portrait techniques, however, your work will improve dramatically. There are many portrait-making methods that can help you develop your own...

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Ron Eggers Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

One reason that many photographers prefer working in a studio is because they can totally control all aspects of light, from its source to its power, temperature, and direction. To control light in a studio, photographers utilize a variety of light modifiers, including umbrellas, softboxes, light tables, and barn doors.

Shooting in the field...

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Jason Schneider Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), the world-renowned center of imaging tech, research, and photographic education, and Leica Camera, acclaimed for its legendary cameras and outstanding optics, proclaimed May 6, 2008 as Leica Day. The daylong event, hosted by RIT at its impressively large modern campus, was celebrated with speeches, lectures, tours, slide shows, seminars...

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David B. Brooks Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I began as a photographer back in 1952 while in the US Air Force during the Korean conflict. After being assigned to duty in Anchorage, Alaska, I found myself in an environment of great natural beauty, so taking pictures was both logical and a much better option than drinking beer and playing cards in the canteen. The first happy accident in my life as a photographer came as a...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Oct 01, 2008 0 comments

I recently had the opportunity to photograph poison dart frogs, and I was excited to do so because these unique creatures have brilliant colors and are endlessly fascinating. While they make for amazing pictures, they also present significant technical challenges. I had to do some thoughtful planning before I attempted to shoot them. I started out by buying several tropical plants...

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Steve Bedell Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

The first time I saw some of Thom Rouse's work, I was stunned. It was so artistically and technically excellent I had to stop and study it for a while, just like you do when visiting a gallery. That's why I had to share it with you. Rouse is a portrait and wedding photographer who regards digital photography as not just an advancement of conventional photography but as...

Jack Neubart Posted: Sep 01, 2008 2 comments

Twenty years in business together, the team of Bohm-Marrazzo (Montclair, New Jersey-- www.bohm-marrazzo.com) comes well equipped to tackle the challenge of photographing kids and animals for their advertising clients. Experience has taught them to incorporate these highly animated subjects into the picture to make an...

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Brian Kosof Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

As someone who prefers a minimal style, I want to control, beyond the usual photographic variables, the level of detail and the sense of depth in an image. For this I have embraced the use of diffusion while enlarging. The use of diffusion during film exposure to soften a scene, or when used in a portrait to reduce skin texture and flaws, is long established. Nature can be just as...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

In the early days of digital imaging, we were promised much. Suppliers, manufacturers, photo writers, and early-adopter photographers talked about how digital would allow us do more with photographs. We'd be able to see them instantly, send them quickly, and, most important to the serious-minded among us, control them creatively. Digital cameras and the digital process would...

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Posted: Sep 01, 2008 0 comments

"I've done the calculations time and again," Gomez says, "and I couldn't run my own site for anywhere near the cost."

The photographic career of Jody Gomez started off simply enough, as a spectator parent when her son began riding steers. Frustrated by the poor quality of the pictures snapped and sold by another parent, Gomez began taking...

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