Pro Techniques

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RJ Wiley Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The Audubon Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Southwest Florida has been left virtually untouched by man, except for the construction of one of the world’s most beautiful boardwalks that wanders through the heart of this ancient bald cypress swamp. In July 2007, the discovery of a ghost orchid at Corkscrew was very big news. Ghost orchids are rare; it’s estimated there are only 1000...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the traditional compositional guidelines that many artists and photographers adhere to is that a subject’s movement should go toward the center of the frame. You can see this method of composing an image in the photo of the frigate bird (#1) that I placed on the left side of the frame; it is flying toward the imaginary vertical center line of the image. Similarly, I placed the tall...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

Whenever you place a call to tech support—for any reason—take notes. Get names and of course dates and jot down a summary of all conversations. Nine times out of 10, when a customer complains about the behavior of a tech support agent, the conversation begins “I don’t know who I was talking to but…”

When you’re on hold and hear: “Your call...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

My biggest surprise in shooting the famous Carnival of Venice was how accommodating the costumed people were to be photographed. I had assumed that they would become quickly annoyed with all the photographers stopping them and wanting pictures, but the opposite was true. They came out just to be photographed. Some were out as early as 7am and in the sunrise lighting they posed in front of the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

“Understanding the genres, history, and style of the music is a huge part of my success,” John Scarpati observes. “I work very closely with the bands and artists to make sure the cover art reflects what they want to say.” Scarpati (www.scarpati.com), as he prefers to be called (“when someone yells Scarpati on set...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Last fall I got an e-mail and a few JPEG attachments from Jody Dole, a commercial and advertising photographer whose career adventures I’ve chronicled over the years in these and other pages. “I’ve been having a good time making 19th-century cyanotype look-alike images,” Jody wrote.

Turns out, Jody had been up to more than cyanotypes. He also had a...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

It’s common to see blinking buttons and scrolling banners and other animated graphics on websites that look pretty much the same as those on every other website. I want to show you how you can do something different with animation: blur an image, then use animation to grab your viewer’s attention by bringing the blurred photo back into focus.

I’ll be using Ulead...

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Eric Dusenbery Posted: Feb 01, 2009 1 comments

In many ways, Florida seems like a thoroughly modern state. New developments and towering skyscrapers dot the urban contemporary landscape. Tourism display racks contain dozens of the latest amusement and attraction brochures. Each year, millions of visitors descend upon Florida to experience the beaches, theme parks, major cities, and golf courses.

However, away from the...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2009 1 comments

The photographs of Philip Perkis come from his own inner world; they are quiet images that speak to us intimately. Presented in a recent show at the Alan Klotz Gallery in New York, many of them grace the pages of his new book The Sadness of Men, published by The Quantuck Lane Press.

Currently a teacher at Pratt Institute and the School of Visual Arts...

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George Schaub Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

If you love black and white photography you should check out the tools and techniques that allow you to make customized “conversions” from your RGB digital image files.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

It seems easy to create a black and white from a digital image. At its most basic level all that is required is selecting “Convert to Grayscale,” which is found in almost every image-editing program on the market.

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

My friend wanted to begin shooting digital images of small objects for his company’s website, so he asked me to get him a deal on an expensive, full-frame D-SLR. The images were to be used primarily online at low resolution, and occasionally in an HTML e-mail newsletter. They were using a professional photographer to shoot the artwork for brochures, packaging, and their trade show booth.

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Jon Canfield Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

Canvas prints are becoming extremely popular these days and there are a tremendous number of options available to you, both traditionally mounted with a frame and with a gallery wrap, where the image wraps around the side of the mount and no frame is used. Good options for online printing include Canvas On Demand (www.canvasondemand.com)...

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Jody Gomez Posted: Feb 01, 2009 0 comments

The photographic career of Jody Gomez started off simply enough, as a spectator parent when her son began riding steers. Frustrated by the poor quality of the pictures snapped and sold by another parent, Gomez began taking her own photographs, starting off with an entry-level 35mm Canon Rebel. In short order, Gomez was installed as the official photographer for the California Junior Bull Riders...

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George Schaub Posted: Dec 01, 2008 9 comments

Google “photographer” and you get, as of this writing, about 140 million (!) possible URLs; do the same for “photographer web pages” and you get over 25 million! The motivation for creating a web page with your photographs is legion: it can be used to display your work to a worldwide audience; showcase work to potential clients; license images for sale in publications and...

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