Pro Techniques

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Efrain M. Padro Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

Comprised of almost 390,000 square miles (slightly bigger than France and Germany put together), Patagonia is located in the southernmost third of both Argentina and Chile. Here the Andes Mountains plunge into the Pacific Ocean, leaving a trail of glaciated valleys, rugged granite peaks, ancient glaciers, jade green lakes, and endless plains. This stark and surreal landscape is also rich in...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: May 01, 2009 0 comments

After a while, showing wasn’t enough. Telling became the point.

And because Chris Heisey knows his Civil War, he has a lot to tell in his photographs.

Chris has been photographing Civil War battlefields for almost 20 years, and at the start he took straightforward record shots. “I’m self-taught,” he says, “and...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

SBA means “Shake Begins At”—the level at which camera movement makes your images lose the sharpness battle.

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

When Canadian engineer Joseph Cacic designed and built a tripod in the late 1990s that would accommodate bird’s eye aerial images, Boston photographer Frank Siteman was among his first customers. For Siteman it was the perfect solution for the environmental photographs that he favors. Weighing 75 lbs and easy to roll, the tripod can be placed in a garden without disturbing any of the floras...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The who, what, when, and where of the story are easy.

Commercial and advertising photographer Charles Orrico was commissioned about two years ago by an ad agency to photograph at the abandoned Kings Park Psychiatric Center in Kings Park, New York, on behalf of a holding company that planned to develop the site. Building 93, the main structure in the complex, was of special...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the things that makes a photograph successful is that attention is directed to the subject. This can be done with good lighting, muted backgrounds, or graphic design. An important design element that directs our attention into the heart of a picture is called a leading line. This is a line that usually begins at the bottom of the composition and extends into the heart of the scene...

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RJ Wiley Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

The Audubon Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Southwest Florida has been left virtually untouched by man, except for the construction of one of the world’s most beautiful boardwalks that wanders through the heart of this ancient bald cypress swamp. In July 2007, the discovery of a ghost orchid at Corkscrew was very big news. Ghost orchids are rare; it’s estimated there are only 1000...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

One of the traditional compositional guidelines that many artists and photographers adhere to is that a subject’s movement should go toward the center of the frame. You can see this method of composing an image in the photo of the frigate bird (#1) that I placed on the left side of the frame; it is flying toward the imaginary vertical center line of the image. Similarly, I placed the tall...

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Jon Sienkiewicz Posted: Apr 01, 2009 0 comments

Whenever you place a call to tech support—for any reason—take notes. Get names and of course dates and jot down a summary of all conversations. Nine times out of 10, when a customer complains about the behavior of a tech support agent, the conversation begins “I don’t know who I was talking to but…”

When you’re on hold and hear: “Your call...

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Jim Zuckerman Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

My biggest surprise in shooting the famous Carnival of Venice was how accommodating the costumed people were to be photographed. I had assumed that they would become quickly annoyed with all the photographers stopping them and wanting pictures, but the opposite was true. They came out just to be photographed. Some were out as early as 7am and in the sunrise lighting they posed in front of the...

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Jack Neubart Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

“Understanding the genres, history, and style of the music is a huge part of my success,” John Scarpati observes. “I work very closely with the bands and artists to make sure the cover art reflects what they want to say.” Scarpati (www.scarpati.com), as he prefers to be called (“when someone yells Scarpati on set...

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Barry Tanenbaum Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

Last fall I got an e-mail and a few JPEG attachments from Jody Dole, a commercial and advertising photographer whose career adventures I’ve chronicled over the years in these and other pages. “I’ve been having a good time making 19th-century cyanotype look-alike images,” Jody wrote.

Turns out, Jody had been up to more than cyanotypes. He also had a...

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Anthony L. Celeste Posted: Mar 01, 2009 0 comments

It’s common to see blinking buttons and scrolling banners and other animated graphics on websites that look pretty much the same as those on every other website. I want to show you how you can do something different with animation: blur an image, then use animation to grab your viewer’s attention by bringing the blurred photo back into focus.

I’ll be using Ulead...

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Eric Dusenbery Posted: Feb 01, 2009 1 comments

In many ways, Florida seems like a thoroughly modern state. New developments and towering skyscrapers dot the urban contemporary landscape. Tourism display racks contain dozens of the latest amusement and attraction brochures. Each year, millions of visitors descend upon Florida to experience the beaches, theme parks, major cities, and golf courses.

However, away from the...

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Rosalind Smith Posted: Feb 01, 2009 1 comments

The photographs of Philip Perkis come from his own inner world; they are quiet images that speak to us intimately. Presented in a recent show at the Alan Klotz Gallery in New York, many of them grace the pages of his new book The Sadness of Men, published by The Quantuck Lane Press.

Currently a teacher at Pratt Institute and the School of Visual Arts...

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