George Schaub

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George Schaub  |  Dec 27, 2005  |  0 comments

Commentary

A Look Back: Big Changes, but Some Things Have Remained the Same

by George Schaub

Thinking about the past is natural at this time of year, when part of what
we do is recognize change as being part of the natural cycle of life. In photography,
massive changes have taken place that affectedus...

George Schaub  |  Mar 15, 2005  |  0 comments

Shutterbug Forums create an online community for information, questions and
debate on topics of interest to photographers today. A wide range of topics
are covered, including various camera User Groups, 35mm and Digital SLR photography,
camera collecting, Help desks and more. The Forums are also a great way to get
in touch with Shutterbug writers and editors as well as professional photographers
from around the world. Many of these experts will be moderating focused discussions,
as well as participating in all the Forums at the Shutterbug site.

...

George Schaub  |  Apr 24, 2007  |  0 comments

All Photos © 2006, George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

Here's at...

George Schaub  |  Mar 15, 2005  |  0 comments

The pixels that make up a digital image each have an "address",
a code that defines color, brightness and shades. When we make images with a
digital camera or from film with a scanner we are creating a matrix of pixels
that altogether create the illusion of a continuous tone image. These codes
are not dyes or even densities, but specific information as to how the computer
will interpret the colors and tonal values on the screen. It is only when we
make a print that we leave the "digital" world and enter the world
of dyes and pigments. Because each pixel has a code, basically a bunch of information
that is composed of bits and bytes, we can alter that code to change the "address",
or color and tonal look of every pixel. In this lesson we'll use the Replace
Color dialog box, found in most versions of Photoshop, or under other names
in other programs, to illustrate the point and give you an easy, fun way to
play with your pictures.

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George Schaub  |  Jun 13, 2006  |  0 comments

To add a keyword in the Keyword HUD (which comes up with the keyboard shortcut
Shift-H) click on the plus/minus button on the far left and type in the keyword
required. This creates a main keyword. Here the keywording process gets started
by typing in "kids."

...
George Schaub  |  Jan 30, 2007  |  0 comments

What Happened to My Images ??!!



Corrupted Disks and Rescue Strategies

by George Schaub

I am not sure if it's happened to you, but it's happened to me.
After having spent an afternoon shooting with my digital camera everything suddenly
stopped. While the counter in my camera LED showed that I hadple...

George Schaub  |  Feb 07, 2011  |  1 comments

Remote viewing and shutter release capability opens up a host of picture opportunities, from working high atop camera platforms from ground level to very low level shooting without muddying your clothes (given your camera lacks an articulating monitor) to placing your camera in spots and being able to view and shoot without your being right behind the viewfinder. Many photographers routinely work with radio triggers for flash, especially in studio environments where the lights are set in position and photographer and model or subject move. The Hahnel Inspire adds to the mix with remote shutter release and viewing in one.

Here in this Hahnel supplied illustration you get a good idea of the way the unit works, setting up a signal relationship for both remote viewing and shutter release.

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George Schaub  |  Oct 05, 2005  |  0 comments

Willard (Bill) Clark, a photo industry icon and the former executive director
of Photoimaging Manufacturers & Distributors Association (PMDA), died on Sept.
24. He was 77 years old. Cause of death was cancer.



Mr. Clark was associated with the photo industry for more than 40 years primarily
in consumer and trade journalism, both as a writer and photographer, and more
recently with PMDA. He worked with the senior executives of virtually every firm
in the photo industry, serving as confidant and advisor to many and earning the
respect of all.



Mr. Clark came to New York as a photographer for United Press after working for
a small Ohio newspaper as a reporter and photographer. His equipment in those
days was a 4x5 Speed Graphic, standard issue for a news journalist at that time
but now seen only in photo museums and period movies. In 1954 he became associate
editor of U.S. Camera magazine and then founding editor of Camera 35 magazine.
"I was a staff of one," he once said. He subsequently was appointed
editor.



After a variety of other magazine publishing positions, Mr. Clark came back to
the photo industry in 1981 as editor and associate publisher of Photo Weekly Magazine,
which evolved into Photo Business Magazine. His final publishing stint was a short
one as editor of PTN.



Mr. Clark retired from his position as PMDA executive director earlier this year.



At the time of his retirement, some industry associates paid tribute to him. Stacie
Errera, chief marketing officer for Tamron USA, Inc., and current president of
PMDA, said, "Bill always acted as a professional and was liked by everyone.
Everything Bill did was in the best interest of the organization."



Dan Unger, Agfa's director of marketing and PMDA board member, said of Bill:
"He was an easy-going guy who did everything right."



Mr. Clark is succeeded by two sons, Paul, Ashland, OR, and Bruce, Hopewell, NJ,
both attorneys, and two granddaughters, Fiona, 3 ½ and Emmeline, 1. He
was pre-deceased by his wife, Olga.



Editor's Note: The notes on Bill's life were kindly
provided by Jerry Lansky. I knew Bill for almost twenty years and he was always
a class act, with a kind word and encouragement for all. His "How are you
doin', man!" greeting will always echo in my ears. Those fortunate
enough to have known and worked with him understand that he was a great contributor
to photography and the photo industry and a genuinely good soul. I will miss him
greatly.

--George Schaub ...

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