George Schaub

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George Schaub  |  Mar 01, 2001  |  0 comments

When they first arrived on the scene digital SLRs were well beyond the means of all but the well heeled. News organizations, sports photojournalists, government photographers, and the corporate world were the first to take advantage of the new tech...

George Schaub  |  Mar 01, 2002  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2001  |  0 comments

The Olympus Camedia E-20N is the latest in their series of high-end digital cameras that straddle the line between consumer and professional markets. Although the E-20N does not offer interchangeable lenses, it stretches the envelope on the consumer side by offering features and abilities that outstrip...

George Schaub  |  Aug 01, 2001  |  First Published: Aug 01, 2000  |  0 comments

Professional photographers need a snapshot camera, too. But they require one that delivers the sharpness they have come to expect in their working cameras and a quality look and feel. Happily, there is a small, and somewhat pricey class...

George Schaub  |  Jun 01, 2000  |  0 comments

The digital camera market has seen a lot of new introductions lately, many of which are in the 3.3Mp family. There have also been many introductions of cameras with less pixel power, all priced accordingly. Along with this range of prices and pixel packing has come an understanding of when and...

George Schaub  |  May 30, 2006  |  0 comments

In Brief

WD Passport Portable USB Drives

by George Schaub

It's clear that having a backup strategy when on the road can often make
the difference in image insurance. While downloading to your laptop to clear
your memory cards is now standard operating procedure, you should also consider
burni...

George Schaub  |  Oct 27, 2004  |  0 comments

With the arrival of digital recording and software-based post-processing, techniques
for achieving perfect panning shots and 360° panoramic views are attracting
a lot of attention in the photographic world. The new Novoflex Panorama-VR system
is said to meet the demands of professional photographers for an easy-to-use
adjuster system to rotate a camera 360° around a nodal point.

...

George Schaub  |  Mar 27, 2007  |  0 comments

The Case for Center Weighted Metering

by George Schaub

While today's multi-pattern metering system found in most DSLRs are marvels
of technology, you'll notice that almost every DSLR also has other metering
pattern options. The two main options, with variants available on some cameras,
are center-weightedaver...

George Schaub  |  Jan 04, 2005  |  0 comments

High scene contrast always creates difficulties for photographers, whether
shooting film or digital. The difficulty stems from the difference between the
ways the film or sensor "sees" and how the human eye sees. Our eyes
are adaptive, and can resolve large variations in brightness by the way it scans
throughout the scene and the amazing reflex of automatically restricting and
dilating the pupil to adjust to bright and dark areas before us. While light
metering systems in cameras are impressive in the way they can read light, the
fact remains that at the moment of exposure the lens on a camera records a scene
at one fixed aperture, or opening. In most situations this is no problem, as
the meter averages light values and the bright and dark areas are distributed
through the recording medium properly. But high contrast presents a problem.

A
better solution is to use the --1 contrast setting. This
allows for smoother tonal gradations and addresses the need to
control the divergent light values in this backlit scene.

All Photos © George Schaub, All Rights Reserved

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George Schaub  |  Sep 26, 2006  |  0 comments

One look at the specs of this new Tamron zoom and you'll understand why
it's immediately attractive to anyone carrying around a digital SLR in
their day bag. Weighing in at around 15 oz and measuring just under 3x3.2",
the lens is quite the marvel of size for what it delivers in focal length and
aperture options. Indeed, if someone told me that a constant aperture, 17mm
wide lens would be this size a few years back I'd have thought they had
lost their optical marbles. To be fair, however, that 17mm is not really a 17mm
in 35mm equivalent, thus practical terms, and I wonder why lenses like this
are still labeled that way. This lens is only for APS-C sensors, which means
it has the "35mm equivalent" of a 27mm wide angle view and 80mm
tele.


Tamron's new 17-50mm zoom, available in Canon, Nikon, Konica
Minolta (read Sony), and Pentax (read Samsung) mounts is highly
portable and compact.

...

George Schaub  |  Feb 01, 2005  |  0 comments

If you've ever been walking down the street and a picture caught your
eye, but had no camera to capture the moment, then the small, shirt-pocket size
digicams might just be item you're seeking. A number of companies, including
Pentax, Casio and Minolta have already introduced such models, each with their
own unique feature sets. Now, Contax, a name renowned for exquisite cameras
and excellent lenses, has jumped into the fray with their own version, the U4R,
a 4-megapixel camera sporting a Carl Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* lens. Those familiar
with the amazing image clarity of this line of lenses will immediately recognize
the name; those unfamiliar with it can be assured that it is a legendary name
in optics. The camera has just under a 3x optical zoom lens, delivering the
equivalent of 38-115mm in 35mm format. There's also a digital zoom if
you need it, delivering over 400mm, but as with many digital zooms it's
really a crop into the frame, and will not deliver the quality of the prime
optics.

...

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