Lighting News

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Joe Farace  |  Oct 15, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  1 comments

One trend much in evidence for lighting these days is the use of LED as a light source. Rotolight, distributed in the US by R.T.S. Inc. (www.rtsphoto.com), has several new products in this space, beginning with their RL48-B RingLight. As a continuous light source, the Rotolight is useful for video or still photography. The basic RL48-B includes a filter holder and a Lee Filters Calibration Filter Kit (CTO: 205, 223, and 285; ND/Diffusion: 298, 209, and 216).

Joe Farace  |  Feb 05, 2016  |  0 comments

LED lighting is all the rage with the cool kids and why not? It’s continuous and that’s important for new photographers or anyone wishing to capture hybrid—video and still—imagery. It’s also literally cool, with no eyebrow-melting hot lights making subjects uncomfortable.

C.A. Boylan  |  May 06, 2014  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Nikon COOLPIX L830
The COOLPIX L830 is an ergonomically designed high-ratio zoom camera with a 3” high-resolution tilt LCD monitor. It features a 34x optical zoom range plus a 68x Dynamic Fine Zoom (an enhanced type of digital zoom) range and a 16MP backside illuminated (BSI) CMOS sensor. It records Full HD (1080p) video, even in low light, and reduces the danger of camera shake with the aid of the Lens-shift Vibration Reduction (VR) system. The L830 model’s intelligent features include Easy Auto mode and Smart Portrait System as well as 18 Scene modes and a selection of special effects. The model is available in black and red and has a retail price of $299.95.

C.A. Boylan  |  Mar 13, 2014  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2014  |  0 comments

Nikon SB-300 Speedlight
Small enough to fit into a shirt pocket, the SB-300 Speedlight provides more power and coverage than a built-in flash. Compatible with both Nikon D-SLR and Advanced Performance Coolpix cameras, it covers a wide-angle 18mm in DX format and operates via simple on-camera controls. The SB-300 tilts up to 120 degrees, allowing for more flattering portraits and even exposures. Powered by two AAA batteries, the SB-300 features thermal cut-out protection to prevent overheating when capturing rapid flash images in succession. The suggested price is $149.95.

Joe Farace  |  Oct 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Safari Luminations is a family of monolights and light-modification products aimed at the new shooter or someone getting started in studio photography.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 31, 2019  |  0 comments

Shooting outdoor portraits in natural light seems easy, right, especially on a sunny day. Well, it may be easy to shoot them, but you won’t, necessarily, get flattering shots if you don’t know how to use the sun to your advantage.

Jack Neubart  |  Apr 29, 2014  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2014  |  0 comments

A handheld meter is not just for studio work. Tricky lighting situations, high contrast, and unusual subject tonalities can often pose problems for camera metering systems, as advanced as they are. Beyond that, the camera meter can’t help with studio flash.
The first step toward taking tighter control with a broader range of lighting situations is to use a handheld meter. Enter the new Sekonic LiteMaster Pro L-478DR (PocketWizard version). Out of the box, it measures incident light. This exposure meter will also prove valuable when working with studio (or any manual) flash or a mix of ambient light and flash.

Dan Havlik  |  Apr 17, 2018  |  0 comments

It’s one of the eternal debates in photography: which is better, shooting with a flash or with just natural light? Two professional photographers who we have featured on Shutterbug many times recently tried to find in a “Natural Light vs Off Camera Flash Challenge.” The results might surprise you.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Studio lighting comes in all shapes and sizes, and the lights that are new to photokina certainly support that contention. Our primary focus here is on strobe lighting, but that includes a mix of monolights and power packs (generators), and select flash heads that attach to these generators. If we can see any trend in studio strobes it is the increasing reliance on electronic components and...

Joe Farace  |  Oct 07, 2014  |  0 comments

The first thing I did after receiving Flashpoint’s 180 battery-powered monolight was shoot a few tests to get a feel for how well the unit performed. Although impressed, more so than with some other battery-powered units I’ve used, at one point while shooting with a Canon EOS 60D, a BG-E9 battery grip, and an EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens, I thought, “Wow, why is this camera so heavy?” That was when the “Small Monolight/Small Camera” concept was born and I decided to shoot this review using a Micro Four Thirds camera. And why not, so I worked with my Panasonic Lumix G5 for the test.

Joe Farace  |  Nov 15, 2012  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2012  |  0 comments

One of the first lighting kits I ever owned was a set of Smith-Victor Adapta-Lights that had screw-base sockets for photoflood lamps. Son of a gun, the company still offers Adapta-Lights as an entry-level solution for beginning portrait photographers who want to work with hot lights. On the other hand, if you prefer making portraits using electronic flash, Smith-Victor’s three-light FL700K Strobe Light Kit may be just what you’re looking for.

 

The FL700K Strobe Light Kit that I tested is designed for amateur photographers and aspiring pros and contains two FLC300 (320 ws) FlashLite and one 110i (110 ws) FlashLite monolights. The FLC300 monolights offer continuously variable flash power settings, a test button, a ready light, and an optical slave for wireless triggering and have an umbrella stand adapter that’s compatible with 3/8” through 5/8” light stand posts. To expand the kit’s capabilities, Smith-Victor offers more than 100 accessories and light modifiers for the FLC300 monolights, including softboxes, reflectors, snoots, grids, and barn doors. The 110i monolight has a full- or half-power setting, optical slave, small built-in reflector, and umbrella mount. When used together, all three lights give you lots of flexibility for lighting studio or on-location portraits.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 03, 2014  |  0 comments

Giving a more modern twist to tradition, a team of digital imaging specialists from the Smithsonian Institute created a 3D portrait of President Barack Obama using eight high-resolution sports cameras, six wide-angle cameras, and 50 custom-designed LED lights.

Ron Eggers  |  Oct 01, 2009  |  0 comments

On-camera flash units have been around for some 50 years and now they’ve become much more sophisticated with the development of D-SLRs.

Joe Farace  |  Apr 23, 2013  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Speedotron’s power pack and head systems are the studio lighting world’s equivalent of the American muscle car. They’re powerful, made in the U.S.A., and ruggedly built to take hard use. Since its beginnings the company has offered two lines of lighting systems for photographers with different requirements. The premium-priced Black Line is intended for commercial shooters, while Brown Line products are aimed at portrait photographers, yet when used normally both have similar quality, reliability, and longevity.

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 01, 2010  |  0 comments

Interfit Photographic has introduced Strobies, a system approach to shoe-mount flash accessories. Strobies are designed to take many popular shoe-mount flashes and turn them into versatile lighting tools for studio and location use.

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