Lighting News

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Joe Farace  |  Oct 25, 2012  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2012  |  3 comments

Studio lighting equipment is available in either continuous or electronic flash configurations. Continuous lighting is “on” continuously, much like a light bulb or the sun for that matter, enabling you to use your in camera light meter to measure and see how the light falls on your subject. Continuous lighting sources use photoflood, quartz, or HMI (Hydrargyrum Medium-Arc Iodide) bulbs, which can be hot, leading to the use of the term “hot lights.” An increasing number of continuous lighting tools use Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) or LEDs, producing what are, in effect, “cool” hot lights.

Steve Bedell  |  Apr 02, 2013  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2013  |  0 comments

I am a dyed-in-the-wool natural light shooter. Outdoor portraits are my specialty and 95 percent of my outdoor portraits are taken with nothing but daylight. Yet, unlike other photographers I know, I actually prefer shooting on sunny days, and my studio schedules all day, so there is no waiting for the “golden hour” to get soft, directional light.

Chuck Gloman  |  Nov 01, 2010  |  0 comments

Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are a highly efficient way to provide additional illumination to your shot. Not only are they small and portable, but LEDs consume far less power than tungsten units, can last over 100,000 hours, and give off little or no heat. If you are looking for studio lights that are easily metered (because they can stay on all day), cool to the touch, color temperature...

Joe Farace  |  Apr 10, 2012  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2012  |  0 comments

“Lighting is really common sense and personal observation. This is applied to a few rules of photography which cannot be broken and to others which I tend to bend a little.”—Paul Beeson

 

A monolight or monobloc to our European friends is a self-contained studio flash that is typically, but not always, powered by an AC power source and allows for different light modification devices, including reflectors, light banks, or umbrellas. The key phrase in that last sentence is self-contained. To my way of thinking the biggest advantage monolights possess is just that—if you’re shooting on location or for that matter anywhere and the power pack in a pack and head system stops working, so do you. If you have a couple of monolights and one of them fails, you can still shoot.

Joe Farace  |  Nov 01, 2010  |  0 comments

As studio lights have gotten bigger and shoe-mount flashes more sophisticated, on-location photographers increasingly have reached for speedlights to solve lighting problems.

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 01, 2010  |  0 comments

Every manufacturer has a slightly different take on how to do it and David Honl has come up with his own original solutions in the form of some nifty and very portable light shapers that fit practically any shoe-mount flash without recourse to special adapters.

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Like many photographers, I am always looking for lighting devices that will improve the way my subject looks and also be very easy to use.

Ron Leach  |  Apr 03, 2017  |  0 comments

Fotodiox Pro has introduced an assortment of "Factor" lights that let you achieve studio-style results with no hot spots and a single, clean shadow. Designed for both spot illumination and area lighting, the Factor Series includes nine models in a variety of sizes and shapes.

Jack Neubart  |  Oct 01, 2009  |  0 comments


Guide Number (Standard Illumination Pattern, ISO 100) At 35/200mm Zoom...

Jack Neubart  |  Oct 01, 2009  |  0 comments

Nikon’s Speedlight SB-900 takes over the reins from the SB-800 as the company’s flagship dedicated shoe-mount strobe.

Jack Neubart  |  Oct 01, 2008  |  0 comments

I've had many opportunities to work with battery-operated studio strobe systems. My problem with them was that they were heavy and bulky, not powerful enough, or simply too costly. Then I came upon the Opus Pro OPL-L300 location kit. I immediately noted that the 300 ws monolights were compact. Then I hefted the battery pack. Hmm, not bad, I thought. I could actually carry...

Joe Farace  |  Oct 10, 2016  |  0 comments

In contemporary lighting equipment there are trends and there are fads with some gear seemingly having equal parts of both. And they just aren’t boxes of light anymore; they are lightsabers, small studio lights with big output, and everywhere you look it’s LED lighting in every size, shape, and price.

Robert Harrington  |  Oct 22, 2013  |  First Published: Sep 01, 2013  |  0 comments

Whether you are new to Off-Camera Flash (OCF) or not, you might want to check out one of the most versatile systems on the market for OCF, Rogue FlashBenders, manufactured by ExpoImaging. The Rogue system is based on a pliable flat panel reflector that you bend as needed to modify your light when used in conjunction with speedlights. It is versatile, stores flat in your camera bag, and has a diffusion panel that installs over the modifier to turn it into a portable softbox.

Steve Bedell  |  Apr 19, 2013  |  First Published: Mar 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Like most photographers, I’m always trying to see just how versatile I can make my dedicated speedlights. In my case that would be Nikon SB-800 Speedlights. And when I really want to create a unique look I’ll sometimes use off-camera flash so I can vary the exposure on my subject in relation to the overall scene. That usually involves me adding light to my subject to either match or overpower the ambient light. When I do that I like to have a little more control over the quantity and quality of the light than what I’d have if I just aimed my flash at my subject with no modification.

Cynthia Boylan  |  Dec 17, 2014  |  0 comments

If you are a night owl and love the art of light painting then the Pixelstick should certainly be on your holiday wish list. The Pixelstick transforms the darkness of the night by adding a rainbow of bright LED color to your light painting photography.

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