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George Schaub  |  Nov 09, 2017  |  0 comments

I have been using Epson’s Advanced B&W Photo printing mode for many years in a series of the company’s desktop printers but always wished the print software offered a way to see my image adjustments in real time. So, when Epson announced their new Print Layout software, which offers a “live preview” (among other controls) in Advanced B&W Photo mode, I contacted them to give it a whirl. 

David B. Brooks  |  Mar 14, 2012  |  First Published: Feb 01, 2012  |  12 comments

Pigment inks, CD disc printing, and moderate cost have kept me a loyal user of Epson Stylus Photo printers. I attribute this to the different set of ink colors compared to what’s found in Epson’s professional pigment-ink printers. With the R1900, and now the new R2000, besides the standard cyan, magenta, and yellow, there is red, blue, and orange ink in the set. I find this is favorable to reproducing all my favorite photography subjects, including people, flowers, and landscapes. But, you might ask, without support for black-and-white grayscale printing, how do I get by? Well, I actually use my R1900 to print black-and-white images and a good part of my testing with the R2000 involved printing black-and-white photographs as well.

George Schaub  |  Feb 07, 2013  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2013  |  0 comments

There are those who make prints often, and there are those who make prints occasionally. The split, you might think, is between amateur and pro, but that’s not always the case. Some “amateurs” print as much if not more than some pros, and some pros make their own prints only when they have time, usually for their personal portfolio, but certainly not on every job. That’s why pigeonholing the Epson R3000 in terms of intended audience, amateur or pro, is not so easy. It certainly delivers the quality you might expect from a higher-end Epson model, given its attributes, ink set, fine nozzles, and highly evolved print head, etc., but it’s by no means a volume/production printer, given its single sheet feed for “art” paper, albeit with larger capacity ink carts than some past 13x19” printers, and roll feed capability.

George Schaub  |  Aug 18, 2011  |  First Published: Jul 01, 2011  |  1 comments

I took on this review assignment because I’ve had considerable history with printing, both silver and digital, and printing with Epson printers. Over the past few years this interest has led me on an odyssey through various printers, profiling, and a considerable amount of (early) frustration. My emphasis has been on monochrome printing and those who share in this interest and who have attempted black-and-white printing in the past understand the numerous obstacles it can present. Those include, but are not limited to, unwanted color casts, gloss differential in deep black areas and some tonal borders, poor deep black reproduction (accompanied by equally poor highlight repro), a lot of poor paper surfaces, and the hassle and waste of switching from matte black to photo glossy inks. Color printers face these as well, plus the challenges of color balance, casts, skin tone reproduction, highlight bias, green shadows, and more. Of late I have printed with the Epson Stylus Pro 3800, 3880, and 4800 models, the 3800 being my studio workhorse for years and the 3880 the model that many photo schools and workshops at which I’ve taught use as a mainstay student and production printer.

Theano Nikitas  |  Oct 28, 2014  |  0 comments

Desktop photo inkjet printer release cycles are glacially slow compared to those of digital cameras so it was something of a surprise to learn Epson was going to launch the 13-inch SureColor P600 Professional Photo Printer this morning. While the printer model name has changed from Stylus Photo to SureColor to bring the line under a global branding umbrella, the P600 (P stands for “photo”) takes its place at the top of Epson’s 13-inch photo inkjet printer line, which continues to include Stylus Photo and Stylus Pro models.

Jon Canfield  |  Sep 16, 2015  |  1 comments

A popular option for many photographers looking to print images at up to 17 x 22 inches has been the Epson 3880 printer (and before that the 3800). Essentially an affordable option to Epson’s professional level 4800 and 4900 printers, the Epson 3880 and 3800 use smaller ink cartridges and forgo the ability to use roll paper. It’s been several years since this photo printer lineup has been updated, so when Epson gave me the opportunity to review their new 17-inch SureColor P800 I was interested to see what they were able to come up with to improve an already very good printer.

Dan Havlik  |  Apr 13, 2015  |  0 comments

Epson just took the wraps off its newest professional photo printer: the 17-inch-wide, SureColor P800. The Epson P800 uses a new UltraChrome HD eight-color pigment ink set and revamped Epson MicroPiezo AMC printhead technology.

Dan Havlik  |  Jan 25, 2016  |  0 comments

Epson continued to “think big” this morning while debuting a new 64-inch SureColor P20000 photo printer. Yes, you read that right: it’s a 64-inch photo printer! The Epson SureColor P20000 is the successor to the Epson Stylus Pro 11880, which came out eight years ago.

Shutterbug Staff  |  Sep 14, 2015  |  0 comments

Epson announced a new line-up of professional large-format printers for photography this morning. Called the Epson SureColor P-Series lineup, the printers include the UltraChrome HD eight-ink, 24-inch SureColor P6000 and 44-inch SureColor P8000, which are designed for photographers, graphic designers, and commercial printers.

Jack Neubart  |  Jan 01, 2008  |  0 comments

I always find it a nice icebreaker to show my pictures to people I meet on my travels. I also make it a habit of giving a small print to people I befriend. And the small print costs me pennies. Plus, 4x6 prints are so much easier to tote around than 8x10s. The problem is producing these minilab-size prints. I've wasted numerous 4x6 sheets because of a wrong setting in my...

David B. Brooks  |  Jun 01, 2007  |  0 comments

The Epson Stylus Photo 1280 has been going strong for almost six years now, and you'd think that Epson's replacement model, the Stylus Photo 1400, must be exceptional to be worthy of replacing such a venerable printer. While the idea has merit, the fact is that Epson's letter-sized, dye-ink photo printers, such as the R380, already have new inks; the 1280 was the...

David B. Brooks  |  Jun 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Technical Specifications

 

Printing Technology: Six-color advanced DX5 MicroPiezo inkjet technology optimized for photo printing
Ink Cartridge Configuration: Six individual high-capacity ink cartridges
Ink Type: Claria Hi-Definition Ink (smudge-, scratch-, water-, and fade-resistant photos)
...

John Blackford  |  Aug 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Challenge is good, and Epson's new 13" Stylus Photo R1900 presents a challenge to those who want it all--great color and great black and white printing. Its color output equals anything in the Epson line-up, while black and white is less advanced, perhaps because its target is the photo enthusiast seeking colorful, high-quality, long-lasting prints.

 

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Jon Canfield  |  Nov 01, 2008  |  0 comments

Three years ago, Epson brought out a solid 13x19” printer using the new UltraChrome K3 inks. This model, the R2400, was a major improvement over the 2200 it replaced, thanks to the additional gray inks and a new Advanced Black and White mode in the printer driver. Three years is nearly forever in the digital market, and people have been wondering when a replacement would come and what...

Jack Neubart  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

There are lots of letter-size inkjet printers on the market, but you'd be hard-pressed to find one with this much functionality and at a price of $129.

 

Epson's Stylus Photo R380: Key Features At A Glance

· Dye-based, letter-size inkjet printer
· Six ink colors in individual tanks
· CD/DVD printing on...

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