Travel Photography How To

Sort By: Post DateTitle Publish Date
Lynne Eodice  |  Feb 01, 2003  |  0 comments

Jason Lauré is a veteran of some 25 books during his years as a highly accomplished photojournalist, and his latest--Africatrek--is his most personal book to date. As the subtitle states, this story is "an American photographer's odyssey through Africa." However, this book offers us even more. It's the journey of Lauré's life...

Dan Havlik  |  Dec 22, 2014  |  0 comments

If the U.S. goes forward with its historic plan to open diplomatic ties with Cuba for the first time in 50 years, there will be a lot more photographers capturing this long isolated country. While Cuba hasn’t been entirely cut off photographically over the years, photo trips there have been limited and highly restricted.

Lynne Eodice  |  Jan 01, 2003  |  0 comments

Always artistic, Judith Pishnery was a natural choice to be her high school's yearbook photographer--an initial foray that resulted in her becoming "hooked" on photography. And, because one of her science teachers also taught photography on the side, "I would hang out in the biology department," she recalls.

 

...

Ron Leach  |  Jun 01, 2021  |  0 comments

It’s not often we come across a useful accessory that’s unfamiliar to many of our readers. But this wearable umbrella from Canope is an extremely interesting and unique product for outdoor photographers shooting in bad weather.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 13, 2021  |  0 comments

Danish pro Mads Peter Iversen has spent years polishing his skills and developing a unique style of landscape photography. Like all accomplished photographers he’s made a few mistakes along the way, and in the video below he explains how to correct a common error so you don’t make it yourself.

Ron Leach  |  Dec 30, 2021  |  0 comments

There’s no better way to learn than from the successes (and failures) of a top pro, and in the video below you’ll see some awesome landscape images and pick up several helpful tips on what made them so remarkable.

Efrain M. Padro  |  Aug 08, 2014  |  0 comments

I could hear the predawn call to prayer broadcast from minarets across the city as I climbed the stairs to my hotel’s rooftop. From there I enjoyed a magnificent view of the ancient city of Istanbul. Immediately below me, roughly facing north, was Sultanahmet Square, the city’s historic center, flanked by the Blue Mosque to the left and the Hagia Sophia to the right. Behind and to my right I could see the Sea of Marmara and Asia, while in the distance to the northeast I could see the Strait of Bosphorus. As I stood alone on the rooftop in this city of 14 million people, admiring the view all around, it occurred to me I should get out my camera and take some pictures.

Rich Sheremeta  |  Dec 19, 2012  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2012  |  1 comments

Montana’s rich mining history dates back well over 100 years. In the year 1852, gold was first discovered southeast of Drummond, along Gold Creek, at a site that later became known as the Pioneer Mining District. But it wasn’t until a decade later, in 1862, that a group of prospectors from Colorado discovered gold along Grasshopper Creek, at what was to become the Bannack Town Site, which fueled the Montana gold rush.

Efrain M. Padro  |  Feb 07, 2013  |  First Published: Jan 01, 2013  |  1 comments

Growing up in San Juan, Puerto Rico, I used to love playing in the Spanish colonial castles in Old San Juan, imagining I was a Spanish conquistador getting ready to do battle with foreign attackers. My interest in castles and history has never subsided, although the only shooting I imagine anymore involves my camera, not guns. I was therefore excited when I had the opportunity to visit and photograph a number of castles in Northumberland, a region located in England’s northeastern corner abutting the North Sea. Besides its numerous castles, Northumberland also features wide beaches and tall sand dunes, rugged cliffs, rolling hills, and quaint fishing villages.

Chris Murray  |  Jun 25, 2013  |  First Published: May 01, 2013  |  8 comments

Straddling a beautiful stretch of the Blue Ridge Mountains of northern Virginia, Shenandoah National Park is a hiker’s and photographer’s delight. Located only 70 miles from the nation’s capital, Shenandoah provides an oasis of nature surrounded by ever-encroaching civilization. Long and narrow, the park runs north/south along a ridge crest characterized by rolling hills and mountains, quiet hollows, rushing streams and waterfalls, and verdant forests. Running through the park is Skyline Drive, a 105-mile scenic roadway that meanders along the crest of the Blue Ridge. Along this roadway are 75 overlooks offering unparalleled views of the piedmont to the east and the valley and mountains to the west. The park is also host to a 101-mile segment of the venerable Appalachian Trail as it winds its way from Georgia to Maine.

Ron Leach  |  Jun 21, 2022  |  0 comments

We’ve all marveled at long-exposure landscape photos with soft feather-like clouds and cotton-candy water. The challenge when shooting during the day, is that light levels are usually too high to permit using the slow shutter speeds necessary,

Ron Leach  |  Aug 16, 2021  |  0 comments

Many of history’s greatest photographers gained their fame making b&w landscape images. With today’s modern cameras, and the digital darkroom, most of the goals remain the same but techniques often differ.

Ron Leach  |  Mar 30, 2022  |  0 comments

One of the challenges with all forms of outdoor photography is that scenes often have a wide-range of tones—often beyond the density range of your camera. The best way to deal with situations like these is editing selective portions of the image.

Ron Leach  |  Oct 14, 2021  |  0 comments

Landscape and travel scenes can be particularly striking when captured in black and white. Some photographers set their camera to monochrome so they can see the effect on the LCD screen, while others prefer to shoot in color and make the conversion during the editing process.

Deborah Sandidge  |  Feb 26, 2019  |  0 comments

Color is everywhere, so why would I be writing about finding and using it in photos? Why would this even be a concern?

Pages

X