Talking Pictures

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Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jan 25, 2018  |  0 comments

Albert Normandin has photographed in Myanmar on 13 visits over 12 years. He estimates he’s spent over 600 days in the country. He won’t guess at how many photos he’s taken. This one, though, has somewhat special significance.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Aug 19, 2014  |  0 comments

Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia, is a favorite place for photography for Cindy Dyer, who specializes in botanical subjects, and it was there that two years ago she was featured in an exhibition of 88 of her photos. A visitor to that exhibit, who happened to be the wife of an art director for the U.S. Postal Service, saw her work and mentioned Cindy to her husband, who happened to be looking for specific subject images to license for stamps. Cindy submitted 20 photographs of ferns, from which the Postal Service selected five for First Class Forever Stamps, which are currently available for purchase online at the USPS website.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  May 08, 2015  |  0 comments

It’s not your typical image of that place then, which means Mirjam Evers has done her job well. She has images of the colorful chaos of revelers in full regalia, but the challenge is to get something special. “The travel publications I work for ask for something different and unusual,” Evers says. “She was posing, and most of the photographers were shooting from eye level, so I crouched down.”

Staff  |  Dec 01, 2011  |  First Published: Oct 01, 2011  |  8 comments
Being a musician, a visit to the historic Sun Studio was a must-see tour on a recent trip to Memphis, Tennessee. I selected black and white on my Nikon D300 to capture an authentic feel of the 1950s era inside and outside. Upon leaving the building, a 1955 Cadillac pulled up to drop something off. I had just a minute to get set, compose, and snap off a couple of shots. This classic car under an historic landmark reminded me of one of my favorite country songs, “Guitars, Cadillacs.”
Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 23, 2014  |  0 comments

(In March 1986, the Least Bell’s Vireo, a bird species that Moose Peterson had volunteered to photograph, was listed as endangered, and Moose, who was just starting out as a photographer, was about to learn the power of a single image.)

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 06, 2016  |  0 comments

Most of the photographers were set up at the front of the pool for the 100-meter butterfly final, but Jeff Cable decided to try for a different view of Michael Phelps in that event. You wouldn’t know it from the photo, but he was actually 20 rows up in the seats on the opposite side of the starting block.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Dec 11, 2015  |  0 comments

He lives in a historic California gold-mining town about an hour out of San Diego, so the props for Ed Masterson’s Old West images are easy to come by: a barrel borrowed from a nearby winery, a pistol from a friend’s gun collection, a book from an antique shop, weathered wood from old barns nearby, and so on.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 04, 2016  |  0 comments

Sports shooters live for moments of key action; they also cherish players’ reactions to those moments. Mike Corrado caught the latter at the start of the third game of the World Series, as New York Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard sent a message to Kansas City Royals leadoff hitter Alcides Escobar, who is known for crowding the plate and swinging at first pitches.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Mar 29, 2018  |  0 comments

Stephen Wilkes carried the idea of day-to-night images for a long time. The seed was planted when he photographed the cast and crew of Baz Luhrmann’s Romeo + Juliet for Life magazine.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jan 26, 2016  |  0 comments

The scene is often just the starting point of a Deborah Sandidge photograph. “It’s visualization,” she says. “I’m looking at a scene and imagining what’s going to happen over time.” What was going to happen at the San Antonio, Texas, River Walk was the continuing passage of the water taxis. Sandidge knew they were the key to an expressive, dramatic photograph, one that would get as close as possible to picturing the passage of time.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Jun 21, 2016  |  0 comments

David X. Tejada’s assignment was a lighting demo for a how-to video and end-use images. The location was a private home where he was asked to create the effect of artificial sunlight. The weather cooperated by providing rain.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  May 10, 2018  |  0 comments

Steve Vaccariello had an advantage when he took this photograph of actor Alan Cumming for Aventura magazine. Well, actually three advantages. The first was that he’d photographed Cumming before. The second, they were friends.

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Feb 14, 2017  |  0 comments

Proximity was a factor: corporate and advertising photographer Robert Rathe lives about 10 miles from the long-closed Lorton Correctional Complex in Fairfax County, Virginia. So was a fascination with the concept of what constitutes a prison—physical structure or state of mind? And so was the attraction of documenting and preserving a bit of local history.

Staff  |  May 21, 2013  |  First Published: Apr 01, 2013  |  0 comments
This King Penguin chick, warm in his downy “fur coat,” didn’t seem to mind the snow, cold, or gray skies, but he plaintively called for his parents hoping to be fed. Larger than either parent he seemed to be well cared for, but his full-throated calls and beseeching body language made it clear that he wanted his parents and food now. It’s hard to make your voice heard among so many thousands I’m sure, but it made us smile. He has more in common with human children than he knows.
Shutterbug Staff  |  Dec 20, 2012  |  First Published: Nov 01, 2012  |  5 comments
In the fall of 2011 my wife and I traveled to the Charlevoix region of Quebec known for its spectacular autumn foliage. Unfortunately, the weather was uncooperative with heavy rain, dark clouds, and high winds.

Disappointed but undeterred, I pocketed my Fuji X100 to explore the local vibrant artistic community. I came across the veranda of a local artist’s boutique and my mood immediately improved. The whimsical and creative display with the “Commedia dell’Arte” surreal theme reminded me of children playing joyfully in the rain.

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