Lighting

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Steve Bedell  |  Feb 01, 2001  |  0 comments

I get a whole new way of seeing things when I put black and white film in the camera. It seems like I have a little Photoshop Desaturate command that goes off in the back of my head and suddenly I see everything in shades of gray. Anyone who's...

Dave Howard  |  Nov 01, 2000  |  0 comments

Soon after becoming really serious about your photography, something annoying begins to happen: you become increasingly critical of your results. You start comparing your photographs to those in magazines, and note that, esthetics aside, your...

Steve Nichols  |  Oct 01, 2003  |  0 comments

It started back in the old days of Hollywood. The cameramen and directors needed to devise lighting schemes that would create a realistic, three-dimensional look on film. Their solution was what they call "triangle" lighting.

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Jay Abend  |  Jul 01, 2000  |  0 comments

I have always considered myself a pack and head guy. You know what I mean--big powerful studio flash generators, long cables, and fan-cooled light heads. Growing up I always thought of a pro photographer as the guy with the view camera...

Jim Zuckerman  |  Oct 27, 2014  |  0 comments

The problem with making the right exposures in low light environments is that exposure meters, in-camera and hand held, are not particularly suited for the task. Light meters were designed to read subjects in normal daylight situations or in bright interiors. The meter will deliver a good exposure under these “normal” conditions, but low light photography is anything but normal. There is either a lack of light, many dark areas, very high contrast or all of these combined.

Jim Zuckerman  |  Nov 24, 2014  |  0 comments
Capturing the details in nature requires getting close to small subjects and sometimes you will want to use flash. Shooting close-ups with flash is very different than using flash as you normally do.

The biggest problem we face when using the built-in flash or even a small hotshoe mounted accessory flash for macro work is that a flash sits no more than 6 or 7” above the lens. This means it will illuminate the top of a subject, leaving the middle and bottom portions in shadow. There’s no way the light can be dispersed over the insect, small flower, feather or whatever you might be shooting because it doesn’t have enough distance to do that.

Steve Bedell  |  Oct 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Photos © 2004, Steve Bedell, All Rights Reserved

Through the years, I've experimented with many different styles of light and many different light modifiers. There's an old saying that "light is light." That's true, but what a complicated...

Cynthia Boylan  |  Aug 20, 2014  |  0 comments

Metz has just launched the latest addition to its flash system lineup: the new Mecablitz 64 AF-1. Offering an impressive guide number of 64 (210 feet) at ISO 100/21˚, it has a large color touch display, an Automatic Flash mode with 12 f/stops, a Manual Flash mode with 25 partial light levels and a Remote TTL mode.

Jack Neubart  |  Oct 01, 2008  |  0 comments

I've worked with all kinds of Internet photo studios over the years. Most consist of a light tent of sorts, with or without lights, and the materials used are translucent fabric or plastic. But I have never come across anything like the MyStudio 20 until now. It is definitely different. So, does different make it better, or even as functional as other tabletop setups?

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Steve Bedell  |  Oct 01, 2002  |  0 comments

Many years ago when I opened my first studio, I visited another photographer who had been in business for many years. When I saw his camera room, I noticed he had a big "X" on the floor in a few...

Cynthia Boylan  |  Sep 25, 2014  |  0 comments

A great tool to have in your gear bag or pocket when shooting at night or in dark areas in the rugged outdoors, the Pelican ProGear 3310PL LED flashlight flashlight was created to be tough, reliable and practical.

Jack Neubart  |  Nov 01, 2001  |  0 comments

Multiple-flash lighting is easier than ever with today's dedicated flash technology.

When in Madeira, while working on my Kodak Electronic Flash book (Silver Pixel Press), I found myself...

Jim Zuckerman  |  Apr 24, 2014  |  2 comments
On-camera flash has a bad reputation—and for good reason. In fact, many photographers are turned off to using flash altogether because they don’t like the look of pictures taken when the flash is sitting on the camera. The images look flat, dimensionless, and many subjects look “pasty” with this kind of lighting.
Steve Bedell  |  Mar 01, 2011  |  1 comments

Most of us know about making outdoor portraits using the small fill flash on our cameras. But these photos have a “look” that tells everyone they were “made with flash.” They have a flat, often harsh look to them. A more sophisticated technique that can be accessed with many new cameras is the use of off-camera flash; you can even use multiple units controlled directly from the camera. I use...

Jay Abend  |  Oct 01, 2004  |  0 comments

Photos © 2004, Jay Abend, All Rights Reserved

The look of flash photography has been a problem for photographers for decades. As we migrated from huge silver reflectors stuffed with flash bulbs to smaller and more portable electronic flash units, the look of on-camera...

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