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Shutterbug Staff  |  Sep 04, 2007  |  0 comments

LightScribe Direct Disc Labeling has announced the LightScribe Travel Kit that
enables users to preserve their vacation memories and add a personal touch to
their DVD and CD label designs. The LightScribe Travel Kit's DVD / CD label tips,
templates, and resources are available for free download on lightscribe.com -
just in time as people return from summer holidays.



To ensure that discs containing their travel memories stand out, customers owning
a LightScribe-enabled drive can go to the Travel Kit (www.lightscribe.com/go/create)
and download travel DVD and CD label designs, mailers, and disc sleeve designs
that reflect their favorite trip memories to share with family and friends.



With the new kit, travelers can create personalized custom designs that integrate
travel photos with text so that the discs are personalized and capture their special
memories from each unique trip. With LightScribe, photo and video CDs and DVDs
can be labeled with a memorable photo from the vacation so that the discs can
be quickly identified with a favorite visual memory.



LightScribe -- a laser DVD / CD label burning technology found in many popular
brands of disc burners, laptops and PCs -- gives people the ability to easily
burn silkscreen-quality photos, graphics, images and text directly onto LightScribe
CDs and DVDs. A simple title printed in normal mode will typically take a couple
of minutes. A fuller disc image will take approximately 15-20 minutes. LightScribe
DVDs and CDs come in gold, with CDs available in red, orange, yellow, blue and
green.



LightScribe DVD and CD label burning technology, the only widely-available embedded
disc label technology, is licensed to over 80 optical drive and media manufacturers,
software developers, media and computer brands worldwide.
...

Joe Farace  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

"Even he, to whom most things that most people would think were pretty smart were pretty dumb, thought it was pretty smart."--Douglas Adams

Do you wiki? A wiki is a special kind of website that lets users collectively add and edit content. (Wiki wiki means rapidly in Hawaiian.) If you want to create your own online wiki take a look at Wetpaint...

Chris Maher and Larry Berman  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  14 comments

An educator since the early 1960s, Jerry Uelsmann began assembling his photographs from multiple negatives decades before digital tools like Photoshop were available. Using as many as seven enlargers to expose a single print, his darkroom skills allowed him to create evocative images that combined the realism of photography and the fluidity of our dreams.

...

Barry Tanenbaum  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  1 comments

Years ago, before I became a free-lancer, I worked at a publishing company that every summer held a couple of employee baseball games, and for each game I was asked the same question: "You gonna play or shoot?"

Tough decision. I loved to play baseball. Though my passion exceeded my skills, I was a reliable singles hitter and played an adequate first base.

Phillip Andrews  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

There is no doubt that a well-crafted lith print is, to borrow an oft-used phrase from my father-in-law, "a thing of beauty is (therefore) a joy forever." The trick, for the experienced and occasional darkroom users alike, is the production of such a print. I have always had difficulty getting consistency with the production of my prints. Despite this frustration, my...

Peter K. Burian  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

The long-awaited replacement for the SD10 that was released in 2004, Sigma's new SD14 (average street price: $1599) retains the best features of its predecessor but benefits from improvements that make it more competitive with the latest cameras. These include higher resolution; a larger/brighter viewfinder; a faster, more versatile autofocus system; greater burst depth;...

Howard Millard  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

No matter how careful you are, soft happens. Your subject, whether a femme fatale or a flower, may move. The light level may be low so you have to shoot at a slow shutter speed, and camera movement blurs the photo slightly. Or you may be photographing under bright overcast conditions outdoors--plenty of light for most situations--but you're shooting soccer...

Jack Neubart  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Who would have thought that back when I bought my Olympus C-2100, which then boasted a 2-megapixel CCD, that one day I would be writing about cameras a fraction of its size with 10-megapixel imaging sensors? Interestingly, that camera sported a 10x optical zoom with Optical Image Stabilization (both courtesy of Canon). The cameras currently under discussion don't have 10x...

Steve Bedell  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  2 comments

Digital has created a tremendous amount of change in the last few years, and photographers who have not been quick to adapt have lost business and, perhaps more importantly, business opportunities. The landscape has changed dramatically, and the people doing professional photography range from MWACs (Moms With A Camera) who work for practically nothing or for friends to very...

David B. Brooks  |  Sep 01, 2007  |  0 comments

Some believe film is dead, but I get as many e-mails from photographers as ever asking about film scanning. The reason is that digital cameras have brought more photographers into using a computer for photography so now they want to access the film images they have made over the years in digital format. A new, dedicated 35mm scanner model is a rarity these days; none of the...

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